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Led by goaltender [[Vladislav Tretiak]] and forwards [[Valeri Kharlamov]], [[Alexander Yakushev]], [[Vladimir Vladimirovich Petrov|Vladimir Petrov]] and [[Boris Mikhailov (ice hockey)|Boris Mikhailov]], the Soviet Union won gold at the 1970 and 1971 World Championships and the [[1972 Winter Olympics]].<ref name="Num67">{{Cite web|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/the-iihf/100-year-anniversary/100-top-stories/story-67.html|title=Story #67–The perfect game against the best team: Czechoslovaks-Soviets 7-2|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-10|year=2008|author=[[#Podmon|Szemberg, Szymon; Podnieks, Andrew]]}}</ref> 1972 marked the first time that both the Olympics and World Championships were held in the same year as separate events. At the [[1972 World Ice Hockey Championships|World Championships]] in Prague, the Czechoslovak team ended the Soviet team's streak and won their first gold since 1949.<ref name="Num5"/> The Soviet team quickly returned to their winning ways, winning 1973 and 1974 World Championships. However, during the latter tournament, the Czechoslovak team defeated the Soviets 7–2. It was one of the biggest margins the Soviet team had ever lost by in an official game.<ref name="Num67"/> The [[1976 World Ice Hockey Championships|1976 World Championships]] were held in [[Katowice]], [[Poland]]. On the opening day of the tournament, [[Poland men's national ice hockey team|Poland]] defeated the Soviet Union 6–4 thanks to a [[hat-trick]] from forward Wieslaw Jobczyk and the goaltending of Andrzej Tkacz. It was one of the biggest upsets in international hockey history; two months earlier at the [[1976 Winter Olympics]], Poland had lost 16–1 to the Soviets. The Soviets lost two more games and won the silver, and Czechoslovakia won gold. Poland finished seventh and was relegated to Pool B, the division in which teams play for ranking purposes and not the championship (now known as Division I).<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/the-iihf/100-year-anniversary/100-top-stories/story-39.html|title=Story #39–Poland scores biggest shocker in World Championship history|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-10|year=2008|author=[[#Podmon|Szemberg, Szymon; Podnieks, Andrew]]}}</ref>
 
Led by goaltender [[Vladislav Tretiak]] and forwards [[Valeri Kharlamov]], [[Alexander Yakushev]], [[Vladimir Vladimirovich Petrov|Vladimir Petrov]] and [[Boris Mikhailov (ice hockey)|Boris Mikhailov]], the Soviet Union won gold at the 1970 and 1971 World Championships and the [[1972 Winter Olympics]].<ref name="Num67">{{Cite web|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/the-iihf/100-year-anniversary/100-top-stories/story-67.html|title=Story #67–The perfect game against the best team: Czechoslovaks-Soviets 7-2|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-10|year=2008|author=[[#Podmon|Szemberg, Szymon; Podnieks, Andrew]]}}</ref> 1972 marked the first time that both the Olympics and World Championships were held in the same year as separate events. At the [[1972 World Ice Hockey Championships|World Championships]] in Prague, the Czechoslovak team ended the Soviet team's streak and won their first gold since 1949.<ref name="Num5"/> The Soviet team quickly returned to their winning ways, winning 1973 and 1974 World Championships. However, during the latter tournament, the Czechoslovak team defeated the Soviets 7–2. It was one of the biggest margins the Soviet team had ever lost by in an official game.<ref name="Num67"/> The [[1976 World Ice Hockey Championships|1976 World Championships]] were held in [[Katowice]], [[Poland]]. On the opening day of the tournament, [[Poland men's national ice hockey team|Poland]] defeated the Soviet Union 6–4 thanks to a [[hat-trick]] from forward Wieslaw Jobczyk and the goaltending of Andrzej Tkacz. It was one of the biggest upsets in international hockey history; two months earlier at the [[1976 Winter Olympics]], Poland had lost 16–1 to the Soviets. The Soviets lost two more games and won the silver, and Czechoslovakia won gold. Poland finished seventh and was relegated to Pool B, the division in which teams play for ranking purposes and not the championship (now known as Division I).<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/the-iihf/100-year-anniversary/100-top-stories/story-39.html|title=Story #39–Poland scores biggest shocker in World Championship history|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-10|year=2008|author=[[#Podmon|Szemberg, Szymon; Podnieks, Andrew]]}}</ref>
   
===1976–1987: First years of open competition and continued Soviet dominance===
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===1976–1987: First years of open competition===
 
[[Günther Sabetzki]] became president of the IIHF in 1975 and helped to resolve the dispute with the CAHA. The IIHF agreed to allow "open competition" between all players in the World Championships, and moved the competition to later in the season so players not involved in the [[Season structure of the NHL#Stanley Cup playoffs|NHL playoffs]] could participate. However, NHL players were still not allowed to play in the Olympics, because of both the unwillingness of the NHL to take a break mid-season and the IOC's strict amateur-only policy. The IIHF also agreed to endorse the [[Canada Cup (ice hockey)|Canada Cup]], a competition meant to bring together the best players from the top hockey-playing countries.<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/the-iihf/100-year-anniversary/100-top-stories/story-6.html|title=Story #6–First Canada Cup opens up the hockey world|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-10|year=2008|author=[[#Podmon|Szemberg, Szymon; Podnieks, Andrew]]}}</ref> The [[1976 World Ice Hockey Championships]] in [[Katowice]] were the first to feature professionals although in the end only the [[United States men's national ice hockey team|United States]] made use of the new rule, recalling eight pros from the [[Minnesota North Stars]] and [[Minnesota Fighting Saints]]. The first fully open World Championship was held in [[1977 World Ice Hockey Championships|1977]] in [[Vienna]], [[Austria]], and saw the first participation of active Canadian NHL players, including two-time [[Hart Memorial Trophy|NHL MVP]] [[Phil Esposito]]. Sweden and Finland also augmented their rosters with a few NHL and WHA players. Many of the players on the Canadian team were not prepared for the tournament and were unfamiliar with the international game. The team finished fourth, losing both games to the Soviet Union by a combined score of 19–2. Czechoslovakia won gold, becoming the third team (after Canada and the Soviet Union) to win consecutive championships.<ref name="Num13"/>
 
[[Günther Sabetzki]] became president of the IIHF in 1975 and helped to resolve the dispute with the CAHA. The IIHF agreed to allow "open competition" between all players in the World Championships, and moved the competition to later in the season so players not involved in the [[Season structure of the NHL#Stanley Cup playoffs|NHL playoffs]] could participate. However, NHL players were still not allowed to play in the Olympics, because of both the unwillingness of the NHL to take a break mid-season and the IOC's strict amateur-only policy. The IIHF also agreed to endorse the [[Canada Cup (ice hockey)|Canada Cup]], a competition meant to bring together the best players from the top hockey-playing countries.<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/the-iihf/100-year-anniversary/100-top-stories/story-6.html|title=Story #6–First Canada Cup opens up the hockey world|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-10|year=2008|author=[[#Podmon|Szemberg, Szymon; Podnieks, Andrew]]}}</ref> The [[1976 World Ice Hockey Championships]] in [[Katowice]] were the first to feature professionals although in the end only the [[United States men's national ice hockey team|United States]] made use of the new rule, recalling eight pros from the [[Minnesota North Stars]] and [[Minnesota Fighting Saints]]. The first fully open World Championship was held in [[1977 World Ice Hockey Championships|1977]] in [[Vienna]], [[Austria]], and saw the first participation of active Canadian NHL players, including two-time [[Hart Memorial Trophy|NHL MVP]] [[Phil Esposito]]. Sweden and Finland also augmented their rosters with a few NHL and WHA players. Many of the players on the Canadian team were not prepared for the tournament and were unfamiliar with the international game. The team finished fourth, losing both games to the Soviet Union by a combined score of 19–2. Czechoslovakia won gold, becoming the third team (after Canada and the Soviet Union) to win consecutive championships.<ref name="Num13"/>
   
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