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At an IIHF congress in 1969, officials voted to allow [[Checking (ice hockey)|body-checking]] in all three zones in a [[Ice hockey rink|rink]] similar to the NHL. Prior to that, body-checking was only allowed in the [[Ice hockey rink#Zones|defending zone]] in international hockey. The IIHF later described the rule change as "arguably the most substantial and dramatic rule changes in the history of international hockey" because it allowed for a more aggressive game.<ref name="Num19">{{Cite web|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/the-iihf/100-year-anniversary/100-top-stories/story-19.html|title=Story #19–IIHF allows bodychecking in all three zones|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-10|year=2008|author=[[#Podmon|Szemberg, Szymon; Podnieks, Andrew]]}}</ref> The rule, which was first applied at the 1970 World Championships, was controversial: IIHF president [[Bunny Ahearne]] feared it would make ice hockey "a sport for goons."<ref name="Num19"/> Several other rule changes were implemented in the early 1970s: players were required to wear [[Hockey helmet|helmet]]s starting in 1970 and [[goaltender mask]]s became mandatory in 1972.<ref name="Timeline"/> In 1992, the IIHF switched to using a playoff system to determine medalists and decided that tie games in the medal round would be decided in a [[Penalty shootout|shootout]]. The IIHF decided to test a new rule in 1997 that would allow two-line passes. Prior to that, the [[neutral zone trap]] had slowed the game down and reduced scoring. At the 1997 World Championships, teams were allowed to decide if they wanted to test the rule. Although no team accepted the offer, the rule was adopted. The IIHF described it as "the most revolutionary rule change since allowing body-checking in all three zones in 1969. [...] The new rule almost immediately changed the game for the better. The 1999 IIHF World Championship in Norway was a stark contrast to the finals the year before with many more goals scored and with end-to-end action&nbsp;– not defence&nbsp;– dominating play."<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/the-iihf/100-year-anniversary/100-top-stories/story-27.html|title=Story #27–Dropping the red-line, allowing the two-line pass changes the Game|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-11|year=2008|author=[[#Podmon|Szemberg, Szymon; Podnieks, Andrew]]}}</ref>
 
At an IIHF congress in 1969, officials voted to allow [[Checking (ice hockey)|body-checking]] in all three zones in a [[Ice hockey rink|rink]] similar to the NHL. Prior to that, body-checking was only allowed in the [[Ice hockey rink#Zones|defending zone]] in international hockey. The IIHF later described the rule change as "arguably the most substantial and dramatic rule changes in the history of international hockey" because it allowed for a more aggressive game.<ref name="Num19">{{Cite web|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/the-iihf/100-year-anniversary/100-top-stories/story-19.html|title=Story #19–IIHF allows bodychecking in all three zones|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-10|year=2008|author=[[#Podmon|Szemberg, Szymon; Podnieks, Andrew]]}}</ref> The rule, which was first applied at the 1970 World Championships, was controversial: IIHF president [[Bunny Ahearne]] feared it would make ice hockey "a sport for goons."<ref name="Num19"/> Several other rule changes were implemented in the early 1970s: players were required to wear [[Hockey helmet|helmet]]s starting in 1970 and [[goaltender mask]]s became mandatory in 1972.<ref name="Timeline"/> In 1992, the IIHF switched to using a playoff system to determine medalists and decided that tie games in the medal round would be decided in a [[Penalty shootout|shootout]]. The IIHF decided to test a new rule in 1997 that would allow two-line passes. Prior to that, the [[neutral zone trap]] had slowed the game down and reduced scoring. At the 1997 World Championships, teams were allowed to decide if they wanted to test the rule. Although no team accepted the offer, the rule was adopted. The IIHF described it as "the most revolutionary rule change since allowing body-checking in all three zones in 1969. [...] The new rule almost immediately changed the game for the better. The 1999 IIHF World Championship in Norway was a stark contrast to the finals the year before with many more goals scored and with end-to-end action&nbsp;– not defence&nbsp;– dominating play."<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/the-iihf/100-year-anniversary/100-top-stories/story-27.html|title=Story #27–Dropping the red-line, allowing the two-line pass changes the Game|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-11|year=2008|author=[[#Podmon|Szemberg, Szymon; Podnieks, Andrew]]}}</ref>
   
The current IIHF rules differ slightly from the [[National Hockey League rules|rules used in the NHL]].<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/sport/iihf-rule-book.html|title=IIHF Rule Book|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-11}}</ref> One difference between NHL and IIHF rules is [[ice hockey rink|rink]] dimensions: the NHL rink is narrower, measuring 61x26&nbsp;metres (200x85&nbsp;feet), instead of the international size of 61x30&nbsp;metres (200x98.5&nbsp;feet).<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Olympics/2010Vancouver/2006/06/08/1620669-sun.html|title=VANOC shrinks Olympic ice|date=2009-02-24|accessdate=2009-03-11|publisher=Canadian Online Explorer|work=[[The Vancouver Sun]]}}</ref> Another rule difference between the NHL and the IIHF rules concerns how [[Icing (ice hockey)|icings]] are called. In the NHL, a [[Official (ice hockey)#Linesman|linesman]] stops play due to icing if a defending player (other than the goaltender) touches the puck before an attacking player is able to,<ref name="icing" /> in contrast to the IIHF rules where play is stopped the moment the puck crosses the goal line.<ref name="icing">{{cite web |url=http://www.nhl.com/rules/rule65.html |title=Icing the puck |author=National Hockey League |publisher=National Hockey League|accessdate=2006-06-08 |year=2005}}</ref> The NHL and IIHF differ also in penalty rules. The NHL, in addition to the [[Penalty (ice hockey)#Types of penalties|minor and double minor penalties]] called in IIHF games, calls major penalties which are more dangerous infractions of the rules, such as fighting, and have a duration of five minutes.<ref name="major">{{cite web |url=http://www.nhl.com/rules/rule27.html |title=Major penalties |author=National Hockey League |publisher=National Hockey League|accessdate=2006-06-08 |year=2005}}</ref> This is in contrast to the IIHF rule, in which players who fight are ejected from the game.
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The current IIHF rules differ slightly from the [[National Hockey League rules|rules used in the NHL]].<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/sport/iihf-rule-book.html|title=IIHF Rule Book|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-11}}</ref> One difference between NHL and IIHF rules is [[ice hockey rink|rink]] dimensions: the NHL rink is narrower, measuring 61x26&nbsp;metres (200x85&nbsp;feet), instead of the international size of 61x30&nbsp;metres (200x98.5&nbsp;feet).<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Olympics/2010Vancouver/2006/06/08/1620669-sun.html|title=VANOC shrinks Olympic ice|date=2009-02-24|accessdate=2009-03-11|publisher=Canadian Online Explorer|work=[[The Vancouver Sun]]}}</ref> Another rule difference between the NHL and the IIHF rules concerns how [[Icing (ice hockey)|icings]] are called. In the NHL, a [[Official (ice hockey)#Linesman|linesman]] stops play due to icing if a defending player (other than the goaltender) touches the puck before an attacking player is able to,<ref name="icing" /> in contrast to the IIHF rules where play is stopped the moment the puck crosses the goal line.<ref name="icing">{{cite web |url=http://www.nhl.com/rules/rule65.html |title=Icing the puck |author=National Hockey League |publisher=National Hockey League|accessdate=2006-06-08 |year=2005}}</ref> The NHL and IIHF differ also in penalty rules. The NHL, in addition to the [[Penalty (ice hockey)#Types of penalties|minor and double minor penalties]] called in IIHF games, calls major penalties which are more dangerous infractions of the rules, such as fighting, and have a duration of five minutes.<ref name="major">{{cite web |url=http://www.nhl.com/rules/rule27.html |title=Major penalties |author=National Hockey League |publisher=National Hockey League|accessdate=2006-06-08 |year=2005}}</ref> This is in contrast to the IIHF rule, in which players who fight are ejected from the game.<ref name="fighting_iihf">{{cite web |url=http://www.hockeycentral.co.uk/olympics/diff_rules.html |title=Ice Hockey Essentials&nbsp;— International vs. NHL |publisher=[[Canadian Broadcasting Corporation|CBC Sports]]|accessdate=2009-03-12 |year=2006}} {{Dead link|date=September 2010|bot=H3llBot}}</ref>
   
 
Beginning with the [[2005–06 NHL season|2005–06 season]], the NHL instituted several new rules. Some of them were already used by the IIHF, such as the shootout and making the two-line pass legal.<ref>{{Cite web|last=Burnside |first=Scott |url=http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=2114523 |title=Rule changes geared toward entertainment |accessdate=2009-03-12 |date=2005-07-25 |publisher=[[ESPN]]}}</ref> Others which were not picked up by the IIHF, such as requiring smaller [[goaltender]] equipment and the addition of the [[Ice hockey rink#Goaltender trapezoid|goaltender trapezoid]] to the rink.<ref>{{Cite web|title=Olympics vs. NHL: How the rules are different|url=http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=2261075|publisher=ESPN|date=2005-12-16|accessdate=2009-03-08}}</ref> However, the IIHF did agree to follow the NHL's league's zero-tolerance policy on obstruction and required referees to call more [[Hooking (ice hockey)|hooking]], holding and interference penalties.<ref>{{Cite web|title=Tough test for Turin; cap on the brain|url=http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=2256450|publisher=ESPN|author=Burnside, Scott|accessdate=2009-03-08date=2005-12-14}}</ref><ref>{{Cite web|title=Story #31–Zebras told to crackdown&nbsp;— once and for all|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/the-iihf/100-year-anniversary/100-top-stories/story-31.html|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-08|year=2008|author=[[#Podmon|Szemberg, Szymon; Podnieks, Andrew]]}}</ref> In 2006, the IIHF voted to eliminate tie games and institute a three point system: wins in regulation time would be worth three points, overtime wins would be two points and over-time losses would be worth one point. The system was first used at the 2007 World Championships.<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/the-iihf/100-year-anniversary/100-top-stories/story-93.html|title=Story #93–Tie games are history; a win earns three points for teams|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-10|year=2008|author=[[#Podmon|Szemberg, Szymon; Podnieks, Andrew]]}}</ref>
 
Beginning with the [[2005–06 NHL season|2005–06 season]], the NHL instituted several new rules. Some of them were already used by the IIHF, such as the shootout and making the two-line pass legal.<ref>{{Cite web|last=Burnside |first=Scott |url=http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=2114523 |title=Rule changes geared toward entertainment |accessdate=2009-03-12 |date=2005-07-25 |publisher=[[ESPN]]}}</ref> Others which were not picked up by the IIHF, such as requiring smaller [[goaltender]] equipment and the addition of the [[Ice hockey rink#Goaltender trapezoid|goaltender trapezoid]] to the rink.<ref>{{Cite web|title=Olympics vs. NHL: How the rules are different|url=http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=2261075|publisher=ESPN|date=2005-12-16|accessdate=2009-03-08}}</ref> However, the IIHF did agree to follow the NHL's league's zero-tolerance policy on obstruction and required referees to call more [[Hooking (ice hockey)|hooking]], holding and interference penalties.<ref>{{Cite web|title=Tough test for Turin; cap on the brain|url=http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=2256450|publisher=ESPN|author=Burnside, Scott|accessdate=2009-03-08date=2005-12-14}}</ref><ref>{{Cite web|title=Story #31–Zebras told to crackdown&nbsp;— once and for all|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/the-iihf/100-year-anniversary/100-top-stories/story-31.html|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-08|year=2008|author=[[#Podmon|Szemberg, Szymon; Podnieks, Andrew]]}}</ref> In 2006, the IIHF voted to eliminate tie games and institute a three point system: wins in regulation time would be worth three points, overtime wins would be two points and over-time losses would be worth one point. The system was first used at the 2007 World Championships.<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.iihf.com/iihf-home/the-iihf/100-year-anniversary/100-top-stories/story-93.html|title=Story #93–Tie games are history; a win earns three points for teams|publisher=International Ice Hockey Federation|accessdate=2009-03-10|year=2008|author=[[#Podmon|Szemberg, Szymon; Podnieks, Andrew]]}}</ref>
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