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Wisconsin Badgers men's ice hockey
Current season
Wisconsin Badgers men's ice hockey athletic logo
University University of Wisconsin–Madison
Conference Big Ten
Head coach Tony Granato
5th season, 62–72–12 (.466)
Captain(s) Ty Emberson
Alternate captain(s) Tarek Baker
Tyler Inamoto
Ty Pelton-Byce
Arena Kohl Center
Capacity: 15,359
Surface: 200' x 97'
Location Madison, Wisconsin
Colors Cardinal and White[1]
         
Fight song On, Wisconsin!
NCAA Tournament championships
1973, 1977, 1981, 1983, 1990, 2006
NCAA Tournament Runner-up
1982, 2010
NCAA Tournament Frozen Four
1970, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1990, 2006, 2010
NCAA Tournament appearances
1970, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2005, 2006 2008, 2010 2013 2014
Conference Tournament championships
1970, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1982, 1983, 1988, 1990, 1995, 1998, 2013, 2014
Conference regular season championships
1977, 1990, 2000
Current uniform
B1G-Uniform-UW.png

The Wisconsin Badgers men's ice hockey team is the college ice hockey team that represents the University of Wisconsin–Madison in Madison, Wisconsin. The team plays at the Kohl Center and is coached by Tony Granato. The Badgers ice hockey team competes in the Big Ten Conference.

The Badgers have won three WCHA regular season conference titles and 11 conference tournament titles.[2] They have also made 24 appearances in the NCAA men's ice hockey tournament, advancing to the Frozen Four 12 times.[3] The team's six national titles rank fourth best in college hockey history.[4]

Their most recent national championship came in 2006 when the Badgers defeated the Boston College Eagles 2–1 at the Bradley Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.[2][3]

History[]

Early history[]

Pond hockey had been played on Lake Mendota in Madison since the late 1800s. The University of Wisconsin formed an informal hockey program in the 1910s. The 1921 season saw the development of intercollegiate hockey at Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota.[5][6] Michigan and Wisconsin scheduled four games to be played on consecutive weekends from February 18 to 26, 1921.[7]

Modern era[]

The modern era of Badger hockey began in 1963 with the decision of athletic director Ivan B. Williamson. The Badgers played home games at the Hartmeyer Ice Arena before moving to the Dane County Coliseum in 1967. The program began as an independent NCAA Division I team and scheduling 8 games against Western Collegiate Hockey Association teams, losing all 8 games. Late in the 1965–66 season, the Badgers finally broke through, beating the Minnesota Golden Gophers 5–4 in overtime, their first win over a WCHA opponent. At the end of that season, Coach John Riley retired.

Johnson era[]

Jake Gardiner playing for Wisconsin (2010).

In 1966, Wisconsin hired "Badger" Bob Johnson. Under Johnson, Wisconsin was offered WCHA membership for the 1969–70 season. In that same season the Badgers received a bid to the NCAA Division I Men's Ice Hockey Tournament. The Badgers won their first national championship at the 1973 Frozen Four.[8] Badger Bob's 1977 team was one of the most successful to date, as the team swept through WCHA tournament and 1977 NCAA Tournament. Behind the efforts of four first team All-Americans, Mike Eaves, Mark Johnson (Bob's son), Craig Norwich and Julian Baretta, the 1977 team won the title with a 6–5 victory in overtime against Michigan.[9]

Despite losing one of their top players, Mark Johnson, to the 1980 American Olympic Team, the Badgers reached the NCAA title game three consecutive times in 1981, 1982, and 1983. Winning the program's third title in 1981 by defeating rival Minnesota in the championship game 6–3.[10] After again reaching the championship game in 1982, where the Badgers lost to North Dakota, the program was dealt a second blow with the departure of Johnson. He would later coach in the NHL and win the Stanley Cup with the Pittsburgh Penguins. He left Wisconsin after 15 seasons with 3 NCAA championships, a record of 367–175–23, and having built the program into an NCAA powerhouse.

Sauer era[]

Former Badger assistant coach Jeff Sauer was hired in 1982 to replace Bob Johnson as head coach. Sauer won the 1983 NCAA championship in his first season. Wisconsin defeated Harvard 6–2 to earn the program's fourth NCAA title.[11] Under Sauer's leadership, the Badgers qualified for eight consecutive NCAA tournaments from 1988 to 1995, and won the program's 5th NCAA title in 1990, with a 7–3 victory over Colgate. Also, Sauer presided over the team's move from the aging Coliseum to the new, on-campus Kohl Center in 1998. The Badger men led the nation in college hockey attendance every year from moving to the Kohl Center through the 2011 season.[12]

Wisconsin again reached the 1992 NCAA Championship game against Lake Superior State, losing 5–3. The game, which featured some questionable calls by the referee that continually put the Badgers at a two-man disadvantage, irked several players so much that they lashed out beyond Sauer's control, verbally abusing the referees and earning Sauer a one-game NCAA suspension. Assistant Coach Bill Zito received a two-game suspension, while players Blaine Moore and Jason Zent each received a one-game suspension.[13] That game was later vacated by the NCAA for rules violations unrelated to the incidents in the championship game.[14] In the mid-1990s, Badger hockey earned NCAA bids in 1998 and 2000, but generally underachieved compared to the high standards of the 1970s and 1980s. The 1999–2000 team featured a duo of second overall NHL draft pick Dany Heatley and Steven Reinprecht, won the MacNaughton Cup, and earned a No. 1 position in the polls for most of the season, only to be upset by Boston College in the NCAA regionals.[15] Two seasons later, during the 2001–02 season, coach Sauer announced his retirement. Jeff Sauer left Wisconsin with two NCAA titles and a record of 489–306–46 at Wisconsin, and a 655–532–57 overall record as a head coach.

Eaves era[]

Badgers gather before a game against Boston University (2010).

Sauer's replacement was Mike Eaves, a former player who was a captain on the 1977 NCAA championship team and still holds the record as Wisconsin's all-time leading scorer.[16] In 2003–04, Eaves brought the Badgers just short of the Frozen Four, falling in overtime to Maine in the 2004 NCAA Tournament. The Badgers returned to national prominence by winning the 2006 NCAA championship in Milwaukee with a 2–1 win over Boston College.[17] In 2010, the Badgers returned to the NCAA championship, vying for a seventh NCAA title but lost 5–0 to Boston College at Ford Field in Detroit, Michigan, in front of a then-record crowd for an indoor ice hockey game of 37,592.[18] In 2011, they missed the WCHA Final-Five and NCAA tournament completely. In 2012, the team missed the NCAA Tournament again. In 2013 they were winners in their last-ever appearance in WCHA final 5 before the team joins the newly established Big Ten Hockey conference for the 2013–14 season. In the inaugural season of the Big Ten Hockey conference, the Badgers won the Big Ten Tournament, their second consecutive conference tournament championship.[19] The 2014–15 season was the worst season in team history. They finished the season with a record of 4–26–5, setting school records for fewest wins and most losses in a season. Eaves was fired on March 18, 2016 after finishing the 2015–16 season with an 8–19–8 record.[20]

Granato era[]

Athletic director Barry Alvarez hired Detroit Red Wings assistant Tony Granato to replace Eaves in late March 2016.[21] Also hired were Tony's younger brother Don Granato, coach of the U.S. National Team Development Program's under-17 team, and Mark Osiecki, associate head coach of the American Hockey League's Rockford IceHogs and former assistant coach at Wisconsin for six years in the 2000s.[22] Tony Granato signed a five-year contract worth $2.75 million while Osiecki and his brother signed three-year deals worth a total of $660,000 a piece.[23] The hires were seen as getting UW Men's Ice Hockey back on track, and was noticed by media, such as the Wisconsin State Journal, when they said "Alvarez answered the critics who think UW no longer cares about men’s hockey in the best way he could" during the press conference introducing all three coaches Alvarez stated "I’m very confident that we’ve taken the right steps today in re-establishing the dominance of our hockey program"[22] All three coaches are Wisconsin alums; Tony Granato played from 1983 to 1987 where he was an All-American, Don Granato played from 1987 to 1991, and Osiecki played from 1987 to 1990.[21] After all three coaches were hired the phrase "Dream Team" came to be used when referring to UW's new coaching staff, it was first used by Barry Alvarez when he said "It was more than I could dream for to get all three of those guys. To me, it's the Dream Team."[21][24][25]

In Granato's first season, he led the team back to respectability with a 20-15-1 overall record and a 12-8 conference record, good enough for second place. On March 18, they lost the conference championship game to Penn State 2–1 in double overtime.[26]

Season-by-season results[27][]

Coaches[]

All-time coaching records[]

As of the end of the 2019–20 season[27]

Tenure Coach Years Record Pct.
1921–1923 A. C. Viner 2 3–13–3 .237
1923–1924 Robert Blodgett 1 3–9–1 .269
1924–1926 Kay Iverson 2 9–10–5 .474
1926–1927 Rube Brandow 1 1–9–0 .100
1927–1930 John Farquhar 3 21–20–7 .510
1930–1931 Spike Carlson 1 4–6–1 .409
1931–1935 Art Thomasen 4 9–22–1 .297
1963–1966 John Riley 3 34–23–3 .592
1966–1975, 1976–1982 Bob Johnson 15 367–175–23 .670
1975–1976 Bill Rothwell * 1 12–24–2 .342
1982–2002 Jeff Sauer 20 489–306–46 .609
2002–2016 Mike Eaves 14 267–225–66 .538
2016–Present Tony Granato 4 62–72–12 .466
Totals 13 coaches 71 seasons 1281–914–172 .578

* Interim

Championships[]

Big Ten Tournament[]

Year Champion Score Runner-up City Arena
2014 Wisconsin 5–4 Ohio State Saint Paul, MN Xcel Energy Center

WCHA Final Five[]

Year Champion Score Runner-up City Arena
2000 North Dakota 5–3 Wisconsin Minneapolis, MN Target Center
2013 Wisconsin 3–2 Colorado College Saint Paul, MN Xcel Energy Center

Frozen Four[]

  • Wisconsin appeared in the Frozen Four championships in the following years:
Year Champion Score Runner-up City Arena
1973 Wisconsin 4–2 Denver Boston, MA Boston Garden
1977 Wisconsin 6–5 OT Michigan Detroit, MI Olympia Stadium
1981 Wisconsin 6–3 Minnesota Duluth, MN DECC
1982 North Dakota 5–2 Wisconsin Providence, RI Providence Civic Center
1983 Wisconsin 6–2 Harvard Grand Forks, ND Ralph Engelstad Arena
1990 Wisconsin 7–3 Colgate Detroit, MI Joe Louis Arena
1992 Lake Superior State 5–3 Wisconsin Albany, NY Knickerbocker Arena
2006 Wisconsin 2–1 Boston College Milwaukee, WI Bradley Center
2010 Boston College 5–0 Wisconsin Detroit, MI Ford Field

Statistical Leaders[27][]

Career points leaders[]

Player Years GP G A Pts PIM
Eaves, MikeMike Eaves 1974–1978 160 94 173 267
Johnson, MarkMark Johnson 1976–1979 125 125 131 256
Welsh, TheranTheran Welsh 1977–1981 161 34 194 228
Granato, TonyTony Granato 1983–1987 152 100 120 220
Lecy, ScottScott Lecy 1977–1981 151 83 127 210
Vincent, RonRon Vincent 1978–1982 159 75 131 206
MacDonald, DougDoug MacDonald 1988–1992 152 75 114 189
DeHate, DelbertDelbert DeHate 1966–1970 95 108 80 188
Grauer, LesLes Grauer 1975–1979 163 83 98 181
Houck, PaulPaul Houck 1981–1985 165 82 95 177
Ranheim, PaulPaul Ranheim 1984–1988 161 88 89 177

Career Goaltending Leaders[]

GP = Games played; Min = Minutes played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; GA = Goals against; SO = Shutouts; SV% = Save percentage; GAA = Goals against average

Minimum 30 games played

Player Years GP Min W L T GA SO SV% GAA
Elliott, BrianBrian Elliott 2003–2007 84 4864 49 27 6 145 16 .930 1.78
Connelly, ShaneShane Connelly 2005–2009 90 5304 41 36 11 211 8 .913 2.39
Gudmandson, ScottScott Gudmandson 2007–2011 70 4022 38 19 7 160 7 .912 2.39
Brückler, BerndBernd Brückler 2001–2005 114 6630 51 41 16 274 8 .916 2.48
Joseph, CurtisCurtis Joseph 1988–1989 39 2267 21 11 5 94 1 .919 2.49

Statistics current through the start of the 2019–20 season.

Players[]

Current roster[]

As of August 31, 2020.[28]

# S/P/C Player Class Pos Height Weight DoB Hometown Previous team NHL rights
3 Flag of Wisconsin Stange, SamSam Stange Freshman F 6' 1" (1.85 m) 200 lb (91 kg) 2001-04-20 Eau Claire, Wisconsin Sioux Falls (USHL) DET, 97th overall 2020
4 Flag of Alberta Holloway, DylanDylan Holloway Sophomore F 6' 1" (1.85 m) 203 lb (92 kg) 2001-09-23 Bragg Creek, Alberta Okotoks (AJHL) EDM, 14th overall 2020
5 Flag of Illinois Inamoto, TylerTyler Inamoto (A) Senior D 6' 2" (1.88 m) 198 lb (90 kg) 1999-05-06 Barrington, Illinois USNTDP (USHL) FLA, 133rd overall 2017
7 Flag of Minnesota Vorlicky, MikeMike Vorlicky Sophomore D 6' 1" (1.85 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 2000-07-17 Edina, Minnesota Edina (USHS–MN)
8 Flag of Wisconsin Caufield, ColeCole Caufield Sophomore F 5' 7" (1.7 m) 165 lb (75 kg) 2001-01-02 Stevens Point, Wisconsin USNTDP (USHL) MON, 15th overall 2019
9 Flag of Sweden Weissbach, LinusLinus Weissbach Senior F 5' 9" (1.75 m) 177 lb (80 kg) 1998-04-19 Gothenburg, Sweden Tri-City (USHL) BUF, 192nd overall 2017
11 Flag of Wisconsin Gorniak, JackJack Gorniak Junior F 5' 11" (1.8 m) 187 lb (85 kg) 1999-09-15 West Salem, Wisconsin West Salem (USHS–WI) MON, 123rd overall 2018
13 Flag of Minnesota Ahcan, RomanRoman Ahcan Junior F 5' 9" (1.75 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1999-03-24 Savage, Minnesota Cedar Rapids (USHL)
14 Flag of Finland Peltonen, JesperJesper Peltonen Junior D 5' 10" (1.78 m) 179 lb (81 kg) 1998-06-08 Helsinki, Finland Omaha (USHL)
15 Flag of Illinois De St. Phalle, MathieuMathieu De St. Phalle Freshman F 5' 9" (1.75 m) 160 lb (73 kg) 2000-03-20 Lake Forest, Illinois Chicago (USHL)
16 Flag of Wisconsin Baker, TarekTarek Baker (A) Senior F 5' 10" (1.78 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 1997-02-22 Verona, Wisconsin Sioux City (USHL)
17 Flag of Wisconsin Pelton-Byce, TyTy Pelton-Byce (A) Senior F 6' 2" (1.88 m) 195 lb (88 kg) 1997-04-14 Madison, Wisconsin Harvard (ECAC)
18 Flag of Illinois Lindmark, OwenOwen Lindmark Sophomore F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 2001-05-17 Naperville, Illinois USNTDP (USHL) FLA, 137th overall 2019
19 Flag of Wisconsin Caufield, BrockBrock Caufield Junior F 5' 9" (1.75 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1999-03-09 Stevens Point, Wisconsin Green Bay (USHL)
20 Flag of Minnesota Ess, JoshJosh Ess Senior D 5' 11" (1.8 m) 187 lb (85 kg) 1999-04-03 Lakeville, Minnesota Lakeville South (USHS–MN) CHI, 215th overall 2017
21 Flag of Wisconsin Emberson, TyTy Emberson (C) Junior D 6' 1" (1.85 m) 198 lb (90 kg) 2000-05-24 Eau Claire, Wisconsin USNTDP (USHL) ARZ, 73rd overall 2018
23 Flag of Illinois Dhooghe, JasonJason Dhooghe Senior F 5' 7" (1.7 m) 165 lb (75 kg) 1997-03-15 Aurora, Illinois Green Bay (USHL)
24 Flag of Manitoba Kehrer, AnthonyAnthony Kehrer Freshman D 5' 11" (1.8 m) 196 lb (89 kg) 2002-03-04 Winnipeg, Manitoba Sioux City (USHL)
25 Flag of Illinois Mersch, DominickDominick Mersch Junior F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 193 lb (88 kg) 1998-12-16 Park Ridge, Illinois Lincoln (USHL)
26 Flag of Minnesota LaMaster, LukeLuke LaMaster Freshman D 6' 0" (1.83 m) 187 lb (85 kg) 1999-10-17 Duluth, Minnesota Sioux City (USHL)
27 Flag of Minnesota Donovan, RyderRyder Donovan Sophomore F 6' 3" (1.91 m) 203 lb (92 kg) 2000-10-04 Duluth, Minnesota Duluth East (USHS–MN) , 110th overall 2019
28 Flag of Minnesota Donovan, ShayShay Donovan Sophomore D 6' 3" (1.91 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 1998-05-26 Duluth, Minnesota Wilkes-Barre/Scranton (NAHL)
29 Flag of Minnesota Garrity, BenBen Garrity Freshman G 6' 2" (1.88 m) 184 lb (83 kg) 2000-01-20 Rosemount, Minnesota Minot (NAHL)
30 Flag of Michigan Beydoun, RobbieRobbie Beydoun G 6' 0" (1.83 m) 185 lb (84 kg) 1996-10-01 Plymouth, Michigan Michigan Tech (WCHA)
31 Flag of Illinois Rowe, CameronCameron Rowe Freshman G 6' 3" (1.91 m) 212 lb (96 kg) 2001-06-01 Wilmette, Illinois Des Moines (USHL)

Awards and honors[]

Hockey Hall of Fame[29][]

US Hockey Hall of Fame[30][]

NCAA[]

Individual Awards[]

Hobey Baker Award

Derek Hines Unsung Hero Award

  • Aidan Cavallini: 2017

NCAA Scoring Champion

Tournament Most Outstanding Player

All-Americans[]

AHCA First Team All-Americans

AHCA Second Team All-Americans

WCHA[]

Individual Awards[]

Most Valuable Player

Freshman of the Year

Coach of the Year

Tournament Most Outstanding Player

Defensive Player of the Year

Student-Athlete of the Year

All-Conference Teams[]

First Team All-WCHA

Second Team All-WCHA

Big Ten[]

Individual Awards[]

Freshman of the Year

Coach of the Year

Tournament Most Outstanding Player

All-Conference Teams[]

First Team All-Big Ten

Second Team All-Big Ten

Big Ten All-Rookie Team

Wisconsin Badgers Hall of Fame[]

The following is a list of people associated with the Wisconsin men's ice hockey program who were elected into the University of Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame (induction date in parentheses).[31]

Badgers in the NHL[32][]

= NHL All-Star Team = NHL All-Star[33] = NHL All-Star[33] and NHL All-Star Team = Hall of Famers

Player Position Team(s) Years Stanley Cups
Steve Alley Left Wing HFD 1979–1981 0
Marc Behrend Goaltender WPG 1983–1986 0
Mike Blaisdell Right Wing DET, NYR, PIT, TOR 1980–1989 0
Rene Bourque Right Wing CHI, CGY, MTL, ANA, CBJ, COL 2005–2017 0
Alex Brooks Defenseman NJD 2006–2007 0
Adam Burish Right Wing CHI, DAL, SJS 2006–2015 1
John Byce Right Wing BOS 1989–1992 0
Jim Carey Goaltender WSH, BOS, STL 1994–1999 0
Chris Chelios Defenseman MTL, CHI, DET, ATL 1983–2010 3
Steve Clippingdale Left Wing LAK, WSH 1976–1980 0
Jake Dowell Center CHI, DAL, MIN 2016–2017 0
Davis Drewiske Center LAK, MTL 2008–2013 1
Bruce Driver Defenseman NJD, NYR 1983–1998 1
Bruce Eakin Center CGY, DET 1983–1986 0
Robbie Earl Left Wing TOR, MIN 2007–2011 0
Mike Eaves Forward MNS, CGY 1978–1986 0
Brian Elliott Goaltender OTT, COL, STL, CGY, PHI 2007–Present 0
Brian Engblom Defenseman MTL, WSH, LAK, BUF, CGY 1976–1987 2
Brian Fahey Defenseman WSH 2010–2011 0
Kelly Fairchild Center TOR, DAL, COL 1995–2002 0
Patrick Flatley Right Wing NYI, NYR 1983–1997 0
Trent Frederic Center BOS 2018–Present 0
Jake Gardiner Defenseman TOR, CAR 2011–Present 0
Blake Geoffrion Left Wing NSH, MTL 2010–2012 0
Tom Gilbert Defenseman EDM, MIN, FLA, MTL, LAK 2006–2017 0
Cody Goloubef Defenseman CBJ, COL, OTT 2011–Present 0
Tony Granato Left Wing NYR, LAK, SJS 1988–2001 0
Dany Heatley Left Wing ATL, OTT, SJS, MIN, ANA 2001–2015 0
Sean Hill Defenseman MTL, ANA, OTT, CAR, STL, FLA, NYI, MIN 1990–2008 1
Paul Houck Right Wing MNS 1985–1988 0
Matt Hussey Center PIT, DET 2003–2007 0
John Johannson Forward NJD 1983–1984 0
Mark Johnson Defenseman PIT, MNS, HFD, STL, NJD 1976–1987 0
Curtis Joseph Goaltender STL, EDM, TOR, DET, PHO, CGY 1989–2009 0
Andrew Joudrey Center CBJ 2011–2012 0
Nic Kerdiles Left Wing ANA 2016–2018 0
Terry Kleisinger Goaltender NYR 1985–1986 0
Luke Kunin Defenseman MIN 2017–Present 0
Joseph LaBate Left Wing VAN 2016–2017 0
Doug MacDonald Center BUF 1992–1995 0
David Maley Left Wing MTL, NJD, EDM, SJS, NYI 1985–1994 1
Jamie McBain Left Wing CAR, BUF, LAK, ARI 2009–2017 0

Player Position Team(s) Years Stanley Cups
Jake McCabe Defenseman BUF 2013–Present 0
Ryan McDonagh Defenseman NYR, TBL 2010–Present 0
Mike Meeker Center PIT 1978–1979 0
Scott Mellanby Right Wing PHI, EDM, FLA, STL, ATL 1978–1986 0
Michael Mersch Forward LAK 2015–2016 0
Brian Mullen Forward WPG, NYR, SJS, NYI 1982–1993 0
John Newberry Forward MTL, HFD 1982–1986 0
Craig Norwich Defenseman WPG, STL, COR 1995–2002 0
Mark Osiecki Defenseman CGY, OTT, WPG, MNS 1991–1993 0
Joe Pavelski Center SJS, DAL 2006–Present 0
Joe Piskula Defenseman LAK, CGY, NSH 2006–2015 0
Dan Plante Right Wing NYI 1993–1998 0
Victor Posa Defenseman CHI 1985–1986 0
Brian Rafalski Defenseman NJD, DET 1999–2011 3
John Ramage Defenseman CGY, CBJ 2014–2016 0
Paul Ranheim Left Wing CGY, HFD, CAR, PHI, PHO 1988–2003 0
Steven Reinprecht Center LAK, COL, CGY, PHO, FLA 1999–2011 1
Barry Richter Right Wing NYR, BOS, NYI, MTL 1995–2001 0
Mike Richter Goaltender NYR 1988–2003 1
Shaun Sabol Defenseman PHI 1989–1990 0
Peter Scamurra Defenseman WSH 1975–1980 0
Justin Schultz Defenseman EDM, PIT 2012–Present 2
Steve Short Defenseman LAK, DET 1977–1979 0
Gary Shuchuk Center DET, LAK 1990–1996 0
Jack Skille Right Wing CHI, FLA, CBJ, COL, VAN 2007–2017 0
Brendan Smith Defenseman DET, NYR 2011–Present 0
Craig Smith Right Wing NSH 2011–Present 0
Paul Stanton Defenseman PIT, BOS, NYI 1990–1995 2
Derek Stepan Center NYR, ARI 2010–Present 0
Ben Street Left Wing CGY, COL, DET, ANA 2012–Present 0
Gary Suter Defenseman CGY, CHI, PHO, SJS 1985–2002 1
Ryan Suter Defenseman NSH, MIN 2005–Present 0
John Taft Defenseman DET 1978–1979 0
Dean Talafous Forward ATF, MNS, NYR 1974–1982 0
David Tanabe Defenseman CAR, PHO, BOS 1999–2008 0
Chris Tancill Right Wing HFD, DET, DAL, SJS 1990–1998 0
Kyle Turris Center PHO, OTT, NSH 2007–Present 0
Steve Tuttle Right Wing STL 1988–1991 0
Brad Winchester Defenseman EDM, DAL, STL, ANA, SJS 2005–2011 0
Brendan Woods Center CAR 2014–2016 0
Andy Wozniewski Defenseman TOR, STL, BOS 2005–2010 0
Jason Zent Left Wing OTT, PHI 1996–1999 0

See also[]

References[]

  1. Lua error in package.lua at line 80: module 'Module:Citation/CS1/Whitelist' not found.
  2. 2.0 2.1 This is Wisconsin Hockey. Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System (2010).
  3. 3.0 3.1 Wisconsin Badgers Men's Hockey: Year-By-Year. USCHO.com.
  4. DI Men's Ice Hockey Championship History | NCAA.com (en).
  5. "Hockey Stars Begin Season: University Players Start Training for Series of Intercollegiate Matches", January 4, 1921. 
  6. "Gophers Form Hockey Team as College Sport", February 1, 1921. 
  7. "Big Schedule Is Planned By Puck Chasers: Five Veterans Will Form Nucleus of Hockey Squad", January 11, 1921. 
  8. 1973 NCAA Tournament. Inside College Hockey.
  9. 1977 NCAA Tournament. Inside College Hockey.
  10. 1981 NCAA Tournament. Inside College Hockey.
  11. 1983 NCAA Tournament. Inside College Hockey.
  12. http://www.uscho.com/stats/attendance/division-i-men/2012-2013/
  13. http://articles.baltimoresun.com/1992-04-23/sports/1992114045_1_calumet-farm-assistant-basketball-coach-football-coach
  14. 1992 NCAA Tournament. Inside College Hockey.
  15. 2000 NCAA Tournament. Inside College Hockey.
  16. 2009–10 Wisconsin Hockey Fact Book.
  17. 2006 NCAA Tournament. Inside College Hockey.
  18. Gerstner, Joanne C.. "B.C. Wins 4th N.C.A.A. Title, Crushing Wisconsin Before Record Crowd", The New York Times, April 10, 2010. 
  19. Badgers are Big Ten Tournament champions. UWBadgers.com.
  20. http://www.uwbadgers.com/news/2016/3/18/alvarez-change-of-direction-needed-for-mens-hockey.aspx
  21. 21.0 21.1 21.2 http://espn.go.com/college-sports/story/_/id/15077763/wisconsin-badgers-name-detroit-red-wings-assistant-tony-granato-men-hockey-coach
  22. 22.0 22.1 http://host.madison.com/wsj/sports/college/hockey/tom-oates-coaching-staff-coup-shows-uw-hockey-is-high/article_a91dadc1-21e1-5175-a780-789c6ee90623.html
  23. http://www.jsonline.com/sports/badgers/new-uw-hockey-coach-tony-granato-to-get-275-million-over-five-years-b99721763z1-378656271.html
  24. http://www.startribune.com/two-former-burnsville-boys-hockey-state-champions-fill-out-wisconsin-s-dream-team-coaching-staff/374051121/
  25. https://badgerherald.com/sports/2016/03/30/mens-hockey-alvarez-describes-newest-coaching-staff-as-dream-team/
  26. http://www.buckys5thquarter.com/2017/3/19/14973552/wisconsin-mens-hockey-penn-state-big-ten-tournament
  27. 27.0 27.1 27.2 Wisconsin Badgers Men's Hockey 2018-19 Fact Book. Wisconsin Badgers.
  28. 2019–20 Men's Ice Hockey Roster. Wisconsin Athletics.
  29. Legends of Hockey. Hockey Hall of Fame.
  30. United States Hockey Hall of Fame. Hockey Central.co.uk.
  31. University of Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame. Wisconsin Badgers.
  32. Alumni report for U. of Wisconsin. Hockey DB.
  33. 33.0 33.1 Players are identified as an All-Star if they were selected for the All-Star game at any time in their career.

External links[]