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'''Ted Garvin''' (August 20, 1923 – November 18, 1992) was a [[Canada|Canadian]] [[forward]] and [[coach]] primarily in the [[International Hockey League (1945–2001)|International Hockey League]]. Born in [[Sarnia]], [[Ontario]], he began his playing career in the [[Eastern Hockey League]] with the [[Philadelphia Falcons]] (1943–44) and [[Washington Lions]] (1945–46) and played two seasons with the [[Sarnia Sailors]] of the [[International Hockey League (1945–2001)|International Hockey League]] (1949–50 – 1950–51). Garvin led the IHL in goals in the 1949–50 season, scoring 42 with the first-place Sailors. He also finished second in total points that season.
 
'''Ted Garvin''' (August 20, 1923 – November 18, 1992) was a [[Canada|Canadian]] [[forward]] and [[coach]] primarily in the [[International Hockey League (1945–2001)|International Hockey League]]. Born in [[Sarnia]], [[Ontario]], he began his playing career in the [[Eastern Hockey League]] with the [[Philadelphia Falcons]] (1943–44) and [[Washington Lions]] (1945–46) and played two seasons with the [[Sarnia Sailors]] of the [[International Hockey League (1945–2001)|International Hockey League]] (1949–50 – 1950–51). Garvin led the IHL in goals in the 1949–50 season, scoring 42 with the first-place Sailors. He also finished second in total points that season.
   
Garvin began his coaching career by returning to the International Hockey League, where he served as head coach of the [[Port Huron Flags (IHL)|Port Huron Flags]]/[[Port Huron Wings]] for four seasons (1968–69 – 1971–72). Garvin was hired to coach the [[Detroit Red Wings]] in the [[National Hockey League]] for the [[1973–74 NHL season|1973–74 season]], but was fired after his first eleven games in which the team went 2–8–1. He again returned to the IHL as head coach of the [[Toledo Goaldiggers]] (1974–75 – 1978–79) and the team advanced to the finals three times and won two [[Turner Cup]]s in 1974–75 and 1977–78. Garvin also served as head coach of the [[Muskegon Mohawks]] in the IHL for one final season in 1980–81.
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Garvin began his coaching career by returning to the International Hockey League, where he served as head coach of the [[Port Huron Flags (IHL)|Port Huron Flags]]/[[Port Huron Wings]] for four seasons (1968–69 – 1971–72). Garvin was hired to coach the [[Detroit Red Wings]] in the [[National Hockey League]] for the [[1973–74 NHL season|1973–74 season]], but was fired after his first eleven games in which the team went 2–8–1. He again returned to the IHL as head coach of the [[Toledo Goaldiggers]] (1974–75 – 1978–79) and the team advanced to the finals three times and won two [[Turner Cup]]s in 1974–75 and 1977–78. Garvin also served as head coach of the [[Muskegon Mohawks]] in the IHL in 1980–81, the Flint Generals in 1981-82 and returned to the Toledo Goaldiggers in December of 1984 as a replacement for coach Tony Piroski.
   
 
==External links==
 
==External links==
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[[Category:Philadelphia Falcons players]]
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[[Category:Indianapolis Capitals players]]
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[[Category:St. Louis Flyers players]]
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[[Category:Tulsa Oilers (USHL) players]]
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[[Category:Fort Worth Rangers (USHL) players]]
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[[Category:Washington Lions players]]
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[[Category:Detroit Auto Club players]]
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[[Category:Hull Volants players]]
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[[Category:Sarnia Sailors players]]
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[[Category:Port Huron Flags coaches]]
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[[Category:Toledo Goaldiggers coaches]]
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[[Category:Muskegon Mohawks coaches]]
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[[Category:Flint Generals coaches]]
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[[Category:Retired in 1952]]
 
[[Category:Born in 1923]]
 
[[Category:Born in 1923]]
 
[[Category:Dead in 1992]]
 
[[Category:Dead in 1992]]
[[Category:Canadian hockey coaches]]
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[[Category:Canadian ice hockey coaches]]
[[Category:Canadian hockey players]]
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[[Category:Canadian ice hockey players]]
 
[[Category:Detroit Red Wings coaches]]
 
[[Category:Detroit Red Wings coaches]]

Latest revision as of 16:49, 17 November 2011

Ted Garvin (August 20, 1923 – November 18, 1992) was a Canadian forward and coach primarily in the International Hockey League. Born in Sarnia, Ontario, he began his playing career in the Eastern Hockey League with the Philadelphia Falcons (1943–44) and Washington Lions (1945–46) and played two seasons with the Sarnia Sailors of the International Hockey League (1949–50 – 1950–51). Garvin led the IHL in goals in the 1949–50 season, scoring 42 with the first-place Sailors. He also finished second in total points that season.

Garvin began his coaching career by returning to the International Hockey League, where he served as head coach of the Port Huron Flags/Port Huron Wings for four seasons (1968–69 – 1971–72). Garvin was hired to coach the Detroit Red Wings in the National Hockey League for the 1973–74 season, but was fired after his first eleven games in which the team went 2–8–1. He again returned to the IHL as head coach of the Toledo Goaldiggers (1974–75 – 1978–79) and the team advanced to the finals three times and won two Turner Cups in 1974–75 and 1977–78. Garvin also served as head coach of the Muskegon Mohawks in the IHL in 1980–81, the Flint Generals in 1981-82 and returned to the Toledo Goaldiggers in December of 1984 as a replacement for coach Tony Piroski.

External links[edit | edit source]

Detroit Red Wings Head Coaches
Duncan • Adams • Ivan • Skinner • Abel • Gadsby • Harkness • Barkley • J. Wilson • Garvin • Delvecchio • L. Wilson • Kromm • Lindsay • Maxner • Dea • Polano • Neale • Park • Demers • Murray • Bowman • Lewis • Babcock • Blashill


Preceded by
Johnny Wilson
Head Coaches of the Detroit Red Wings
1973
Succeeded by
Alex Delvecchio


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