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Mark Kaufmann
Born (1971-07-07)July 7, 1971,
Tokyo, Japan
Height
Weight
5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
Position Center
Shoots Left
Pro clubs Yale
Asiago Hockey 1935
Portland Pirates
EC KAC
Grasshopper Club Zürich
SC Rapperswil-Jona Lakers
Nikkō Ice Bucks
Ntl. team Flag of Canada.svg.png Canada
Playing career 1989–2003


Mark Kaufmann is a Canadian retired ice hockey center who was an All-American for Yale.[1]

Career[]

Kaufmann was born in Japan was there until age 6 when his family moved back to British Columbia.[2] After working his way through the junior programs, Kaufmann began attending Yale University in the fall of 1989. In his first two seasons with the team, Kaufmann played well but the Bulldogs weren't very good, finishing both years with losing records.[3] Yale and Kaufmann began to see a change in 1991 when his point production nearly doubled and the team posted its first winning season in 5 years. The Bulldogs held firm in Kaufmann's final season but he increased his scoring to more than two points per game and was named an All-American. Kaufmann also set a program record for the most points in a season that stands as of 2021.[4]

After graduating, Kaufmann began his professional career with Asiago but then joined Team Canada for parts of three years. At the tail end of the 1996 season, he signed on with the Portland Pirates and helped the team reach the Calder Cup finals that year. Despite producing in postseason, Kaufmann returned to Europe after the season and played for three teams over the course of the next three years.

In 1999 the Nikkō Ice Bucks were reestablished after a financial crisis and Kaufmann got a chance to return to his first home. He played parts of four years with the club, leading the Bucks in scoring three times, and retired in 2003.

While he had been pursuing his hockey career, Kaufmann had been working part-time as a software designer. As his playing career was coming to a close, he transitioned into linguistic training and worked with the Linguistic Institute until co-founding his own company, LingQ in 2007. He continued to work as the CEO of LingQ while also serving as President of KP Logix, a software company located in the Vancouver area.[5]

Statistics[]

Regular season and playoffs[]

    Regular Season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1988–89 Richmond Sockeyes BCHL 60 42 46 88 34
1989–90 Yale ECAC Hockey 29 9 16 25 36
1990–91 Yale ECAC Hockey 28 10 17 27 12
1991–92 Yale ECAC Hockey 27 25 20 45 18
1992–93 Yale ECAC Hockey 31 25 38 63 10
1992–93 Canada International 7 5 3 8 0
1993–94 HC Asiago Serie A 20 13 18 31
1993–94 Canada International 6 1 2 3 19
1994–95 Canada International 53 30 38 68 14
1995–96 Canada International 53 16 33 49 22
1995–96 Portland Pirates AHL 3 2 1 3 0 24 4 15 19 6
1996–97 EC KAC Austria 55 28 34 62 44
1997–98 Grasshopper Club Zürich NLB 38 31 46 77 24 5 2 2 4 2
1998–99 Grasshopper Club Zürich NLB 40 26 29 55 36 3 1 1 2 4
1998–99 SC Rapperswil-Jona Lakers NLA 3 0 0 0 0
1999–00 Nikkō Ice Bucks JIHL 15 7 7 14 10
1999–00 Canada International 2 0 2 2 0
2000–01 Nikkō Ice Bucks JIHL 40 25 30 55
2001–02 Nikkō Ice Bucks JIHL 38 28 36 64
2002–03 Nikkō Ice Bucks JIHL 22 15 17 32
NCAA totals 115 69 91 160 76
International totals 121 52 78 130 55
NLB totals 78 57 75 132 60 8 3 3 6 6
JIHL totals 115 75 90 165

Awards and honors[]

Award Year
ECAC Hockey All-Rookie Team 1989–90 [6]
All-ECAC Hockey First Team 1991–92 [7]
All-ECAC Hockey First Team 1992–93 [7]
AHCA East Second-Team All-American 1992–93 [1]

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Men's Ice Hockey Award Winners", NCAA.org. 
  2. "Learn English: English LingQ Podcast #3: Mark Kaufmann Talks About His Hockey Career", YouTube, December 15, 2020. 
  3. YALE MEN'S HOCKEY RESULTS, 1895 -2019. Yale Bulldogs.
  4. YALE HOCKEY RECORDS, STAT LEADER. Yale Bulldogs.
  5. Mark kaufmann. Linked In.[self-published]
  6. "ECAC All-Rookie Teams", College Hockey Historical Archives. 
  7. 7.0 7.1 "ECAC All-Teams", College Hockey Historical Archives. 

External links[]

This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Mark Kaufmann. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Ice Hockey Wiki, the text of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License 3.0 (Unported) (CC-BY-SA).


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