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Lloyd Turner

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In what was arguably his most notable achievement, Turner started up two teams each in Calgary and [[Edmonton, Alberta|Edmonton]], two of which eventually became the foundation of the [[Western Canada Hockey League]].<ref name = "HHOF"/> He personally managed the [[Calgary Tigers]], who played so well in the WCHL that they challenged the [[Montreal Canadiens]] for the [[Stanley Cup]] in 1924, albeit in a losing effort. Afterwards, he managed the [[Minneapolis Millers (AHA)|Minneapolis Millers]] of the [[American Hockey Association (1926-1942)|American Hockey Association]] and led them to a championship in 1926. Soon after, he flew back to the west to manage the [[Seattle Metropolitans]], who had joined the Western Canada Hockey League, which at this point had amalgamated with the [[Pacific Coast Hockey Association]] to become the Western Hockey League.
 
In what was arguably his most notable achievement, Turner started up two teams each in Calgary and [[Edmonton, Alberta|Edmonton]], two of which eventually became the foundation of the [[Western Canada Hockey League]].<ref name = "HHOF"/> He personally managed the [[Calgary Tigers]], who played so well in the WCHL that they challenged the [[Montreal Canadiens]] for the [[Stanley Cup]] in 1924, albeit in a losing effort. Afterwards, he managed the [[Minneapolis Millers (AHA)|Minneapolis Millers]] of the [[American Hockey Association (1926-1942)|American Hockey Association]] and led them to a championship in 1926. Soon after, he flew back to the west to manage the [[Seattle Metropolitans]], who had joined the Western Canada Hockey League, which at this point had amalgamated with the [[Pacific Coast Hockey Association]] to become the Western Hockey League.
   
In the 1930s, Turner changed his focus to senior amateur hockey. He wanted to raise the profile of the [[Allan Cup]], so he promised to pay [[W.G. Hardy]], then-president of the [[Canadian Amateur Hockey Association]] (CAHA), $1,500 for every game played in Calgary in the [[1936-37 Allan Cup Final]].<ref name = "HHOF"/> By 2006 standards, this is about $20,000 per game. Turner paid to have fans shuttled in via train from as far as 150 miles away. Thanks to media coverage, the popularity of the tournament skyrocketed, and the CAHA raised a significant amount of funds.
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In the 1930s, Turner changed his focus to senior amateur hockey. He wanted to raise the profile of the [[Allan Cup]], so he promised to pay [[W.G. Hardy]], then-president of the [[Canadian Amateur Hockey Association]] (CAHA), $1,500 for every tournament finals game played in Calgary.<ref name = "HHOF"/> By 2006 standards, this is about $20,000 per game. Turner paid to have fans shuttled in via train from as far as 150 miles away. Thanks to media coverage, the popularity of the tournament skyrocketed, and the CAHA raised a significant amount of funds.
   
 
Turner created and managed several more leagues, teams, and tournaments throughout his life. He concentrated efforts on creating military and civilian tournaments, and he organized the Southern Alberta Indian Tournament, a competition for the First Nations tribes of Alberta. For this, he received the honorary title of ''Chief Sitting Bull.''
 
Turner created and managed several more leagues, teams, and tournaments throughout his life. He concentrated efforts on creating military and civilian tournaments, and he organized the Southern Alberta Indian Tournament, a competition for the First Nations tribes of Alberta. For this, he received the honorary title of ''Chief Sitting Bull.''
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