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Dornhoefer was left unprotected in the [[1967 NHL Expansion Draft]]. The Philadelphia Flyers selected him with in the 13th round, and he would never play with another team.
 
Dornhoefer was left unprotected in the [[1967 NHL Expansion Draft]]. The Philadelphia Flyers selected him with in the 13th round, and he would never play with another team.
   
In [[1967–68 NHL season|that first year]] with Philadelphia, Dornhoefer scored 13 goals and 43 points while accumulating 134 penalty minutes and gaining a reputation as a hard hitting, grinding left winger with a touch for scoring. Two seasons later he reached the 20-goal plateau for the first time, a mark he would achieve in five seasons. In [[1972–73 NHL season|1973]] he had his best season, scoring 30 goals and 49 assists for 79 points and being named to play in the All-Star Game. The most famous play of his career came in the 1973 Stanley Cup playoffs when he scored a crucial overtime goal against the [[Minnesota North Stars]] on a solo rush. The goal was memorialized on a statue at the [[Wachovia Spectrum]], which closed in 2009.
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In [[1967–68 NHL season|that first year]] with Philadelphia, Dornhoefer scored 13 goals and 43 points while accumulating 134 penalty minutes and gaining a reputation as a hard hitting, grinding left winger with a touch for scoring. Two seasons later he reached the 20-goal plateau for the first time, a mark he would achieve in five seasons. In [[1972–73 NHL season|1973]] he had his best season, scoring 30 goals and 49 assists for 79 points and being named to play in the All-Star Game. The most famous play of his career came in the 1973 Stanley Cup playoffs when he scored a crucial overtime goal against the [[Minnesota North Stars]] on a solo rush. The goal was memorialized on a statue at the [[Wachovia Spectrum]], which closed in 2009.
   
 
Although hampered by injuries throughout his career in consequence of his bruising style, Dornhoefer remained an effective scorer through his penultimate season, and was named to play in the All-Star Game again in [[1976–77 NHL season|1977]] after finishing the regular season with a +47 plus/minus mark. The season thereafter, missing nearly half the season through injury, his scoring touch disappeared completely, and he retired after the 1978 playoffs.
 
Although hampered by injuries throughout his career in consequence of his bruising style, Dornhoefer remained an effective scorer through his penultimate season, and was named to play in the All-Star Game again in [[1976–77 NHL season|1977]] after finishing the regular season with a +47 plus/minus mark. The season thereafter, missing nearly half the season through injury, his scoring touch disappeared completely, and he retired after the 1978 playoffs.
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==Retirement==
 
==Retirement==
 
After his retirement following the 1977–1978 season, Gary quickly moved to broadcasting. Gary worked a short time in Philadelphia locally, then moved back to his native [[Ontario]], [[Canada]] to work on ''Hockey Night In Canada'' as a color commentator from 1978 – 1986. After a six year hiatus from broadcasting, Gary moved back to Philadelphia in 1992 and joined the Flyers broadcast team, originally working with beloved late play-by-play man Gene Hart. He served as a Flyers color analyst through the [[2005–06 NHL season]] and is now one of the team's Ambassadors of Hockey.
 
After his retirement following the 1977–1978 season, Gary quickly moved to broadcasting. Gary worked a short time in Philadelphia locally, then moved back to his native [[Ontario]], [[Canada]] to work on ''Hockey Night In Canada'' as a color commentator from 1978 – 1986. After a six year hiatus from broadcasting, Gary moved back to Philadelphia in 1992 and joined the Flyers broadcast team, originally working with beloved late play-by-play man Gene Hart. He served as a Flyers color analyst through the [[2005–06 NHL season]] and is now one of the team's Ambassadors of Hockey.
 
==Gallery==
 
<gallery captionalign="center">
 
7Mar1968-Green_Dornhoefer_Shack.jpg|[[Ted Green]], Gary Dornhoefer, [[Eddie Shack]], March 7, 1968.
 
</gallery>
 
   
 
==External Links==
 
==External Links==

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