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Held every four years, the Canada Winter Games are a showcase of the best under-16 players in the country, representing their home province. Men’s hockey debuted at the inaugural Canada Games in 1967, with the University of Alberta Golden Bears beating the UBC Thunderbirds to win the first gold medal. The tournament replaced the World Under-17 Hockey Challenge every four years through the 1990s and 2000s, before it became a U16 event beginning with the 2011 Games.

Ontario (5G 1S 2B) and Alberta (4G 4S 2B) have owned the top of the podium, combining for nine of the 13 gold medals, and seven different provinces have earned at least one medal. The star-studded alumni list is headed by Sidney Crosby, who wore the ‘C’ for Nova Scotia in 2003 and led the tournament in scoring, while nine members of Ontario’s gold-medal-winning entry from 2007 have seen NHL action (Cuma, Cundari, Del Zotto, Della Rovere, Henrique, Hodgson, Kadri, Pietrangelo, Stamkos).

Men's TournamentsEdit

Year Gold Silver Bronze Location
1967 Alberta British Columbia Ontario Québec City, Québec
1971 Ontario Alberta Québec Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
1975 Alberta Nova Scotia Québec Lethbridge, Alberta
1979 British Columbia Nova Scotia Québec McCreary, Manitoba
1983 Ontario British Columbia Québec Saguenay, Quebec
1987 Québec Ontario British Columbia Cape Breton, Nova Scotia
1991 Ontario Alberta Manitoba Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
1995 Saskatchewan Alberta Québec Grande Prairie, Alberta
1999 Alberta Québec British Columbia Corner Brook, Newfoundland and Labrador
2003 Alberta Québec Ontario Bathurst, New Brunswick
2007 Ontario Manitoba Alberta Whitehorse, Yukon
2011 British Columbia Québec Alberta Halifax, Nova Scotia
2015 Ontario Alberta Manitoba Prince George, British Columbia
2019 Quebec Ontario Alberta Red Deer, Alberta
2023 Prince Edward Island
2027 Yukon
2031 Northwest Territories
2035 Saskatchewan

Women's TournamentsEdit

Year Gold Silver Bronze Location
1991 Alberta British Columbia Québec Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
1995 Ontario Saskatchewan Québec Grande Prairie, Alberta
1999 Ontario Alberta Québec Corner Brook, Newfoundland and Labrador
2003 Ontario Québec Saskatchewan Bathurst, New Brunswick
2007 Ontario Manitoba Québec Whitehorse, Yukon
2011 Alberta Ontario Québec Halifax, Nova Scotia
2015 Québec Ontario Alberta Prince George, British Columbia
2019 Alberta Quebec British Columbia Red Deer, Alberta
2023 Prince Edward Island
2027 Yukon
2031 Northwest Territories
2035 Saskatchewan

Note: Host cities have not been chosen yet for 2023,2027, 2031, 2035 games but host province/territory have been

Women’s hockey tournament historyEdit

Year Gold Silver Bronze 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th
1991 Alberta BC Quebec Ontario Manitoba Saskatchewan New Brunswick Nova Scotia Prince Edward Island Newfoundland
1995 Ontario Saskatchewan Quebec Manitoba Alberta BC New Brunswick Nova Scotia Prince Edward Island Newfoundland
1999 Ontario Quebec Alberta Saskatchewan BC Nova Scotia Manitoba Newfoundland Prince Edward Island New Brunswick
2003 Ontario Quebec Saskatchewan Manitoba Nova Scotia BC Alberta Prince Edward Island Newfoundland New Brunswick Yukon
2007 Ontario[1] ManitobaQuebec Saskatchewan

[2]

Future OlympiansEdit

Player Team Year
Meghan Agosta Team Ontario 2003[3] (Gold Medal)
Cassie Campbell Team Ontario 1991[2] (Fourth place)
Nancy Drolet Team Quebec 1991[4] (Third place)
Jayna Hefford Team Ontario 1995 (Gold Medal)
Haley Irwin Team Ontario 2003[5] (Gold Medal)
Rebecca Johnston Team Ontario 2007[6]
Gina Kingsbury Team Quebec1995, 1999[7]
Charline Labonte Team Québec 1999[8]
Carla MacLeod Team Alberta 1995, 1999 (Bronze)
Caroline Ouellette Team Quebec 1995[9]
Cherie Piper Team Ontario1999[10]
Colleen Sostorics Team Saskatchewan 1995[11]
Tammy Shewchuk Team Québec 1991 and 1995[12]
Sami Jo Small Team Manitoba1991 [13]
Sarah Vaillancourt Team Québec 2003[14]
Catherine Ward Team Québec 2003[15]
Hayley Wickenheiser Team Alberta 1991 (Gold Medal)

ReferencesEdit

  1. Canadian Press. "Ontario wins Winter Games hockey gold", March 10, 2007. Retrieved on 6 April 2010. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 Athletics (PDF). Retrieved on 2010-04-18.
  3. Canadian Gold 2010, Andrew Podnieks, p. 134, Fenn Publishing, Toronto, Canada, ISBN 978-1-55168-384-3
  4. Who's Who in Canadian Sport, Volume 4, p.118, Bob Ferguson, Fitzhenry and Whiteside Ltd., Markham, ON and Allston, MA, ISBN 1-55041-855-6
  5. Podnieks 2010, p. 144
  6. Podnieks 2010, p. 146
  7. Podnieks 2010, p. 150
  8. Podnieks 2010, p. 152
  9. Podnieks 2010, p. 158
  10. Podnieks 2010, p. 160
  11. Podnieks 2010, p. 164
  12. Who's Who in Canadian Sport, Volume 4, p.402, Bob Ferguson, Fitzhenry and Whiteside Ltd., Markham, ON and Allston, MA, ISBN 1-55041-855-6
  13. Who's Who in Canadian Sport, Volume 5, p.409, Bob Ferguson, Fitzhenry and Whiteside Ltd., Markham, ON and Allston, MA, ISBN 1-55041-855-6
  14. Podnieks 2010, p. 170
  15. Podnieks 2010, p. 172
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