2017 IIHF World Championship Final
1 2 3 OT Total
Flag of Canada.png Canada 0 0 1 0 1
Flag of Sweden.png Sweden 0 1 0 0 2
Date 21 May
Arena Lanxess Arena
City Cologne
MVP {{{MVP}}}
Attendance 17,363
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The final of the 2017 IIHF World Championship was played at Lanxess Arena in Cologne, Germany, on 21 May 2017. Teams representing Sweden and Canada competed for the title of World Champion in ice hockey.

The first period of the game was scoreless. Sweden took the lead towards the end of the second period. Canada struck back with a power play goal early in the third period and the game ended with the score tied 1–1. An overtime period saw no further scoring, taking the final to a shootout. Sweden scored two of their three attempts, whilst Canada missed their first four, giving Sweden won the gold medal. It was Sweden's tenth title.

Road to the final[edit | edit source]

Canada had finished top of their group; of their seven games, they won six and lost one in overtime. In the knock-out stages, Canada beat Germany in the quarter-finals and Russia in the semi-finals.[1]

Sweden finished third in their group, with five wins, one loss and one overtime loss in their seven games. They defeated Switzerland at the quarter-final stage and traditional rivals Finland in their semi-final.[1]

Canada Round Sweden
Opponent Result Preliminary round[1] Opponent Result
Flag of the Czech Republic.png Czech Republic 4–1 Game 1 Flag of Russia.png Russia 1–2 (GWS)
Flag of Slovenia.png Slovenia 7–2 Game 2 Flag of Germany.png Germany 7–2
Flag of Belarus.png Belarus 6–0 Game 3 Flag of the United States.png United States of America 3–4
Flag of France.png France 3–2 Game 4 Flag of Latvia.png Latvia 2–0
Flag of Switzerland.png Switzerland 2–3 (OT) Game 5 Flag of Italy.png Italy 8–1
Flag of Norway.png Norway 5–0 Game 6 Flag of Denmark.png Denmark 4–2
Flag of Finland.png Finland 5–2 Game 7 Flag of Slovakia.png Slovakia 4–2
Team GP
W
OTW
OTL
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Flag of Canada.png Canada 7 6 0 1 0 32 10 +22 19
Flag of Switzerland.png Switzerland 7 3 2 2 0 22 14 +8 15
Flag of the Czech Republic.png Czech Republic 7 3 2 0 2 23 14 +9 13
Flag of Finland.png Finland 7 2 2 1 2 20 22 −2 11
Flag of France.png France 7 2 2 0 3 23 19 +4 10
Flag of Norway.png Norway 7 2 0 2 3 13 19 −6 8
Flag of Belarus.png Belarus 7 2 0 1 4 15 27 −12 7
Flag of Slovenia.png Slovenia 7 0 0 1 6 13 36 −23 1
Preliminary
Team GP
W
OTW
OTL
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Flag of the United States.png United States of America 7 6 0 0 1 31 14 +17 18
Flag of Russia.png Russia 7 5 1 0 1 35 10 +25 17
Flag of Sweden.png Sweden 7 5 0 1 1 29 13 +16 16
Flag of Germany.png Germany 7 2 2 1 2 20 23 −3 11
Flag of Latvia.png Latvia 7 3 0 1 3 14 18 −4 10
Flag of Denmark.png Denmark 7 1 2 0 4 13 22 −9 7
Flag of Slovakia.png Slovakia 7 0 1 2 4 12 28 −16 4
Flag of Italy.png Italy 7 0 0 1 6 6 32 −26 1
Opponent Result Playoff[1] Opponent Result
Flag of Germany.png Germany 2–1 Quarterfinals Flag of Switzerland.png Switzerland 3–1
Flag of Russia.png Russia 4–2 Semifinals Flag of Finland.png Finland 4–1

Match[edit | edit source]

The first period between the two teams was goalless, with Canada managing to kill off two penalties.[2] Sweden opened the scoring with Victor Hedman's short-handed goal shortly before the end of the second period. Canada failed to capitalize from Nicklas Bäckström's penalty for slashing[3] and lost possession. Hedman then sent a backhanded shot past several players towards the Canadian goal, which managed to slide under Calvin Pickard.[4] Canada responded two minutes into the third period by converting a power play. Elias Lindholm was caught high-sticking, and the resulting play allowed Ryan O'Reilly to slot in Mitch Marner's rebounded shot.[5]

The game remained tied after overtime, meaning the game was decided via a five-round shootout. While William Nylander missed the opening penalty shot, Bäckström and Oliver Ekman-Larsson both scored their shots for Sweden. Canada failed to register a goal, with Henrik Lundqvist preventing four attempted penalty shots from converting. The win enabled Sweden to claim their 10th championship title.[5] Nylander was named tournament Most Valuable Player, with seven goals and seven assists in ten games.[6]


21 May 2017
20:45
Canada Flag of Canada.png 1–2 GWS
(0–0, 0–1, 1–0)
(OT 0–0)
(SO: 0–1)
Flag of Sweden.png Sweden Lanxess Arena, Cologne
Attendance: 17,363

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Games – 2017 WM. International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved on 26 May 2017.
  2. "Henrik Lundqvist shines in shootout, Sweden denies Canada's bid for third straight world hockey gold", National Post. Retrieved on 22 May 2017. (en) 
  3. "Sweden slips past Canada for gold at worlds", ESPN.com. Retrieved on 24 May 2017. 
  4. "Sweden shock holders Canada in shootout to win world title", Reuters, 21 May 2017. Retrieved on 24 May 2017. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 "Sweden beats Canada in shootout to win world hockey championship", CTVNews, 21 May 2017. Retrieved on 22 May 2017. (en-CA) 
  6. "A Reunion for the Lundqvist Brothers, and a Gold for Team Sweden", The New York Times, 22 May 2017. Retrieved on 22 May 2017. 

External links[edit | edit source]

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