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The 1990 IIHF World Women Championships were held March 19 to 25, 1990, at the Civic Centre in Ottawa, Canada. The Canadian team won the gold medal, the United States won silver, and Finland won bronze. This was the first IIHF-sanctioned international tournament in women's ice hockey.

There was strong international attention directed at the games. The gold medal game packed 9000 people into the arena and drew over a million viewers on television. For unknown reasons, the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association decided that the Canadian team should wear pink and white uniforms instead of the expected red and white.[1] While the experiment only lasted for this tournament, Ottawa was taken over by a "pink craze" during the championships. Restaurants had pink-coloured food on special, and pink became a popular colour for flowers and bow ties.[1]

Qualification Tournament[]

The United States and Canadian teams qualified automatically.[2] A tournament in Asia took place between Korea, Japan, China, India and Hong Kong. Japan won the tournament.[2]

The 1989 European Women's Ice Hockey Championship served as the qualification tournament for this championship. The top five finishers in the top pool qualified. They were Finland, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, and West Germany.[2]

Asian Qualification Tournament (Japan)[]

17 December 1989
Japan Flag of Japan.gif 5-0 Flag of China.gif China
18 December 1989
Japan Flag of Japan.gif 5-0 Flag of China.gif China

Final tournament[]

First Round[]

Group A[]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1 Flag of Canada.png Canada 3 3 0 0 50 - 01 6
2 Flag of Sweden.png Sweden 3 2 0 1 19 - 19 4
3 Flag of Germany.png Federal Republic of Germany 3 1 0 2 04 - 25 2
4 Flag of Japan.gif Japan 3 0 0 3 05 - 33 0
19 March
Canada Flag of Canada.png 15-1 Flag of Sweden.png Sweden
19 March
Federal Republic of Germany Flag of Germany.png 4-1 Flag of Japan.gif Japan
21 March
Canada Flag of Canada.png 17-0 Flag of Germany.png Federal Republic of Germany
21 March
Japan Flag of Japan.gif 4-11 Flag of Sweden.png Sweden
22 March
Canada Flag of Canada.png 18-0 Flag of Japan.gif Japan
22 March
Sweden Flag of Sweden.png 7-0 Flag of Germany.png Federal Republic of Germany

Group B[]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1 Flag of the United States.png United States of America 3 3 0 0 38 - 07 6
2 Flag of Finland.png Finland 3 2 0 1 24 - 06 4
3 Flag of Switzerland.png Switzerland 3 1 0 2 11 - 29 2
4 Flag of Norway.png Norway 3 0 0 3 04 - 35 0
19 March
Norway Flag of Norway.png 1-10 Flag of Finland.png Finland
19 March
United States of America Flag of the United States.png 16-3 Flag of Switzerland.png Switzerland
21 March
United States of America Flag of the United States.png 17-0 Flag of Norway.png Norway
21 March
Finland Flag of Finland.png 10-0 Flag of Switzerland.png Switzerland
22 March
Switzerland Flag of Switzerland.png 8-3 Flag of Norway.png Norway
22 March
Finland Flag of Finland.png 4-5 Flag of the United States.png United States of America

Consolation Round 5-8 Place[]

24 March
Switzerland Flag of Switzerland.png 5-4 Flag of Japan.gif Japan
24 March
Norway Flag of Norway.png 6-3 Flag of Germany.png Federal Republic of Germany

Semifinals[]

24 March
United States of America Flag of the United States.png 10-3 Flag of Sweden.png Sweden
24 March
Canada Flag of Canada.png 6-5 Flag of Finland.png Finland

Consolation Round 7-8 Place[]

25 March
Federal Republic of Germany Flag of Germany.png 9-2 Flag of Japan.gif Japan

Consolation Round 5-6 Place[]

25 March
Switzerland Flag of Switzerland.png 7-6 Flag of Norway.png Norway

Match for third place[]

25 March
Finland Flag of Finland.png 6-3 Flag of Sweden.png Sweden

Final[]

25 March
Canada Flag of Canada.png 5-2 Flag of the United States.png United States of America

Final rankings[]

Susana Yuen is hosted up by her teammates after Canada defeated Team USA to win the 1990 World Women's Championship in Ottawa.

  1. Flag of Canada.png Canada
  2. Flag of the United States.png United States of America
  3. Flag of Finland.png Finland
  4. Flag of Sweden.png Sweden
  5. Flag of Switzerland.png Switzerland
  6. Flag of Norway.png Norway
  7. Flag of Germany.png West Germany
  8. Flag of Japan.gif Japan

Scoring leaders[]

  G A Pts
Cindy Curley, Flag of the United States.png United States of America 11 12 23
Tina Cardinale, Flag of the United States.png United States of America 5 10 15
Cammi Granato, Flag of the United States.png United States of America 9 5 14
Kim Urech, Flag of Switzerland.png Switzerland 8 6 14
Angela James, Flag of Canada.png Canada 11 2 13

Canada's Dawn McGuire was named MVP of the gold medal game.

Bodychecking[]

This is the only major international tournament in Women's ice hockey to allow bodychecking.[3] Before the tournament, bodychecking had been allowed in women's ice hockey in Europe. The European teams, knowing that they were less competitive than the North American teams, asked for bodychecking to be included.[3] For some reason, the Europeans failed to realize the fact that while European women learned to play with other women, most North American players learned to play with men. Consequently, North American players were bigger than European players and used to playing a rougher game. This added to the already significant mismatch between the squads.

After this tournament, the International Ice Hockey Federation disallowed bodychecking in women's ice hockey.[3] It is currently an infraction punished with a minor or major and game misconduct penalty.[4]

In addition, the intermission between periods were twenty minutes instead of fifteen.[2] This has since been abolished and changed to the usual fifteen minutes.

See also[]

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Kelly p. 88.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Andria Hunter Women's Hockey Net page on the IIHF World Women Championships accessed July 16, 2006.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Kelly, p. 89.
  4. International Ice Hockey Federation Section 5, Rule 441 of Official Ice Hockey rules p. 84 accessed July 16, 2006.
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