63-64BosBru.jpg
1963–64 Boston Bruins · NHL
Division 6th NHL
1963–64 record 18-40-12
Goals for 170 (6th)
Goals against 212 (5th)
General Manager Lynn Patrick
Coach Milt Schmidt
Captain Leo Boivin
Arena Boston Garden
Average attendance 10,514
Team Leaders
Goals Murray Oliver (24)
Assists Murray Oliver (44)
Points Murray Oliver (68)
Penalties in minutes Ted Green (145)
Wins Ed Johnston (18)
Goals against average Ed Johnston (3.01)
← Seasons →
1962–63 1964–65

The 1963–64 Boston Bruins season was the 40th season for the franchise. The Bruins finished 6th and missed the playoffs for the fifth consecutive season.

Off-season[edit | edit source]

GM Lynn Patrick made several moves in the off-season to address the team's defensive woes, acquiring All-Star defenseman Tom Johnson in the intra-league draft and trading for minor league veteran Bob McCord.

The 17th National Hockey League All-Star Game was held at Toronto on October 5, 1963. A team of all-stars that included six Bruins, Leo Boivin, Doug Mohns, Tom Johnson, Dean Prentice, Murray Oliver and John Bucyk played against the Stanley Cup champion Toronto Maple Leafs. The game ended in a 3-3 tie with Bucyk and Oliver assisting on the game tying goal.

Regular Season[edit | edit source]

Bruins 1963-64 defense, Boivin, Green, Johnson, Awrey, Westfall and McCord.

The Bruins continued to experience line-up churn in an effort to improve the team. Among the forwards, Calder Memorial Trophy runner-up Cliff Pennington and third-liner Charlie Burns didn't make the roster and were sent to the minors. Pennington wouldn't play in the NHL again while Burns wouldn't return until expansion with the Oakland Seals. Wayne Hicks, who'd played the entire 1962-63 season, was sold. Replacing them was NHL ironman Andy Hebenton, who was claimed in the intra-league, and Orland Kurtenbach, who'd played 8 games for the Bruins in the 1961-62 season. For the third year in a row, Wayne Connelly made the team but as in 1962-63, he'd be sent back to the minors.

Eddie Johnston played all 70 games and had 6 shutouts in 1963-64.

On defense, after losing Irv Spencer in the draft and trading Warren Godfrey, former All-Star Tom Johnson was obtained in the draft. He'd have an excellent campaign in his penultimate NHL season. Bob McCord also had a solid season and finished 5th in voting for the Calder Memorial Trophy. They joined Leo Boivin, newly-appointed assistant captain Ted Green and offensive threat Doug Mohns on the blueline. This was Mohns' last season with the Bruins and although a high scorer, he'd had the worst plus/minus rating on the team for the last several years. Ed Westfall continued to play both defense and right wing. Another piece in the resurgence later in the 1960's was put into place as Don Awrey made the roster out of junior.

In goal, Ed Johnston was the Bruins starter and he became the last goaltender in NHL history to play every minute of every game in a season for his team. The result of these changes was a large improvement in goals against, 28 fewer than the previous season. The issue for the Bruins continued to be lack of scoring.

This was demonstrated right from the season start as the Bruins went winless in their first seven games and scored only 8 goals. The "BOW Line" of John Bucyk, Murray Oliver and Tom Williams was broken up which finally ended the losing streak. An increase in goal scoring in November saw Boston go 3-4-3 in the month and the BOW Line was reunited while Hebenton and Kurtenbach played with Dean Prentice. Don Awrey was sent to the Minneapolis Bruins but would return the next season.

However, depth scoring was lacking and the team had difficulty winning tight games. On December 4, 1963, Andy Hebenton played his 581st consecutive game and broke the record held by Johnny Wilson. Oliver had a 5 point night in the 8-6 win over the New York Rangers on December 7, 1963 but as the lack of scoring from the third and fourth lines continued, Wayne Connelly was relegated to the minors. Having scored only twice in 26 games, he'd spend the next several seasons with the San Francisco Seals before returning to the Bruins in the 1966-67 season. Boston then went on an 11 game winless streak through mid-January.

Score clock showing the Boston 11, Toronto 0 score with goalie #24 Don Simmons, January 18, 1964.

During the January 7, 1964 game at Boston versus Detroit, Tommy Williams was injured and would miss the rest of the season. Fans began to chant "we shall overcome" as the Bruins lost 5-0. Williams' misfortune provided an opportunity for Gary Dornhoefer who was leading the Minneapolis Bruins in scoring in his first pro season. Dornhoefer played right wing with Oliver and Buyck and ended the streak, assisting twice on Bucyk goals in a 6-3 win over Toronto on January 12, 1964. He then scored his first 2 NHL goals in the next game, a 5-1 win over Detroit. The next game was an inexplicable quirk. Playing the Stanley Cup champion Maple Leafs in Toronto, the Bruins beat them 11-0. This remains the largest shutout victory in club history. Hebenton had a hat trick and 4 points while Prentice had 3 goals and 6 points. A week later, Boston shutout Montreal 6-0 and then the next night, shutout Toronto 2-0 in their best run of the season. Dornhoefer potted 2 in the Montreal game, would finish the season with 22 points in 33 games and be fourth in voting for the Calder Trophy.

Orland Kurtenbach became an NHL regular in the 1963-64 season.

However, February saw the Bruins go on another winless drought, this time for eight games. Many of the losses were by one goal and frustrated, many fights broke out in the games. On February 9, 1964, Leo Boivin and Montreal's Bill Hicke fought on the ice and then in the penalty box, which had to be broken up by police. On February 16, 1964 versus Chicago, a melee resulted in five misconducts with Kurtenbach receiving a double misconduct as 120 minutes in penalties were called. Ron Schock was given a 5 game try-out straight from junior and scored in his first game on February 29, 1964. Don Awrey was recalled for the March 15, 1964 game versus Montreal and scored his first NHL goal. The Bruins finished with 48 points, the best in three years. They'd also have 48 points in the next two seasons.

Final Standings[edit | edit source]

National Hockey League
GP W L T GF GA PIM Pts
Montreal Canadiens 70 36 21 13 209 167 982 85
Chicago Black Hawks 70 36 22 12 218 169 1116 84
Toronto Maple Leafs 70 33 25 12 192 172 928 78
Detroit Red Wings 70 30 29 11 191 204 771 71
New York Rangers 70 22 38 10 186 242 715 54
Boston Bruins 70 18 40 12 170 212 858 48

Note: GP = Games played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, Pts = Points, GF = Goals for, GA = Goals against, PIM = Penalties in minutes
Teams that qualified for playoffs are highlighted in bold.

Game Log[edit | edit source]

Regular Season Schedule
No. R Date Score Opponent Record
1 T October 8, 1963 4–4 Montreal Canadiens (1963–64) 0–0–1
2 L October 12, 1963 1–5 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1963–64) 0–1–1
3 L October 13, 1963 0–3 @ Detroit Red Wings (1963–64) 0–2–1
4 L October 16, 1963 2–5 @ Chicago Black Hawks (1963–64) 0–3–1
5 L October 19, 1963 0–2 @ Montreal Canadiens (1963–64) 0–4–1
6 L October 20, 1963 1–5 @ New York Rangers (1963–64) 0–5–1
7 L October 24, 1963 0–2 New York Rangers (1963–64) 0–6–1
8 W October 27, 1963 2–0 Toronto Maple Leafs (1963–64) 1–6–1
9 L October 30, 1963 3–4 @ New York Rangers (1963–64) 1–7–1
10 W November 3, 1963 4–1 Detroit Red Wings (1963–64) 2–7–1
11 L November 7, 1963 3–4 Toronto Maple Leafs (1963–64) 2–8–1
12 W November 10, 1963 4–2 Chicago Black Hawks (1963–64) 3–8–1
13 L November 13, 1963 4–6 @ Chicago Black Hawks (1963–64) 3–9–1
14 T November 16, 1963 1–1 Detroit Red Wings (1963–64) 3–9–2
15 L November 17, 1963 2–3 Montreal Canadiens (1963–64) 3–10–2
16 T November 20, 1963 1–1 @ New York Rangers (1963–64) 3–10–3
17 L November 23, 1963 1–4 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1963–64) 3–11–3
18 W November 28, 1963 5–3 New York Rangers (1963–64) 4–11–3
19 T November 30, 1963 0–0 @ Montreal Canadiens (1963–64) 4–11–4
20 L December 1, 1963 1–3 Montreal Canadiens (1963–64) 4–12–4
21 T December 4, 1963 2–2 @ Chicago Black Hawks (1963–64) 4–12–5
22 L December 5, 1963 2–4 @ Detroit Red Wings (1963–64) 4–13–5
23 W December 7, 1963 8–6 New York Rangers (1963–64) 5–13–5
24 T December 8, 1963 2–2 @ New York Rangers (1963–64) 5–13–6
25 W December 12, 1963 2–1 Chicago Black Hawks (1963–64) 6–13–6
26 L December 14, 1963 1–3 @ Montreal Canadiens (1963–64) 6–14–6
27 T December 15, 1963 4–4 Toronto Maple Leafs (1963–64) 6–14–7
28 W December 18, 1963 2–1 @ Chicago Black Hawks (1963–64) 7–14–7
29 L December 19, 1963 0–3 @ Detroit Red Wings (1963–64) 7–15–7
30 L December 22, 1963 1–4 Chicago Black Hawks (1963–64) 7–16–7
31 L December 25, 1963 1–5 Toronto Maple Leafs (1963–64) 7–17–7
32 L December 28, 1963 0–2 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1963–64) 7–18–7
33 L December 29, 1963 1–2 @ Detroit Red Wings (1963–64) 7–19–7
34 T January 1, 1964 3–3 Montreal Canadiens (1963–64) 7–19–8
35 L January 4, 1964 1–5 @ Montreal Canadiens (1963–64) 7–20–8
36 L January 5, 1964 3–5 @ Chicago Black Hawks (1963–64) 7–21–8
37 L January 7, 1964 0–5 Detroit Red Wings (1963–64) 7–22–8
38 L January 9, 1964 3–5 New York Rangers (1963–64) 7–23–8
39 L January 11, 1964 1–3 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1963–64) 7–24–8
40 W January 12, 1964 6–3 Toronto Maple Leafs (1963–64) 8–24–8
41 W January 16, 1964 5–1 Detroit Red Wings (1963–64) 9–24–8
42 W January 18, 1964 11–0 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1963–64) 10–24–8
43 T January 19, 1964 1–1 Montreal Canadiens (1963–64) 10–24–9
44 L January 22, 1964 4–6 @ New York Rangers (1963–64) 10–25–9
45 L January 23, 1964 1–3 Chicago Black Hawks (1963–64) 10–26–9
46 W January 25, 1964 6–0 @ Montreal Canadiens (1963–64) 11–26–9
47 W January 26, 1964 2–0 Toronto Maple Leafs (1963–64) 12–26–9
48 L January 30, 1964 1–3 New York Rangers (1963–64) 12–27–9
49 L February 1, 1964 1–5 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1963–64) 12–28–9
50 L February 2, 1964 2–5 Chicago Black Hawks (1963–64) 12–29–9
51 W February 5, 1964 3–2 @ New York Rangers (1963–64) 13–29–9
52 W February 6, 1964 4–0 New York Rangers (1963–64) 14–29–9
53 L February 8, 1964 2–3 Detroit Red Wings (1963–64) 14–30–9
54 T February 9, 1964 4–4 Montreal Canadiens (1963–64) 14–30–10
55 L February 13, 1964 1–4 @ Detroit Red Wings (1963–64) 14–31–10
56 L February 16, 1964 3–5 @ Chicago Black Hawks (1963–64) 14–32–10
57 L February 20, 1964 2–3 @ Montreal Canadiens (1963–64) 14–33–10
58 L February 22, 1964 2–3 @ Detroit Red Wings (1963–64) 14–34–10
59 L February 23, 1964 0–2 @ Chicago Black Hawks (1963–64) 14–35–10
60 L February 27, 1964 2–4 New York Rangers (1963–64) 14–36–10
61 W February 29, 1964 2–1 Detroit Red Wings (1963–64) 15–36–10
62 W March 1, 1964 5–3 Toronto Maple Leafs (1963–64) 16–36–10
63 T March 4, 1964 4–4 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1963–64) 16–36–11
64 T March 5, 1964 4–4 Chicago Black Hawks (1963–64) 16–36–12
65 L March 8, 1964 3–5 Detroit Red Wings (1963–64) 16–37–12
66 W March 11, 1964 5–3 @ New York Rangers (1963–64) 17–37–12
67 L March 12, 1964 1–2 @ Detroit Red Wings (1963–64) 17–38–12
68 W March 15, 1964 3–1 Montreal Canadiens (1963–64) 18–38–12
69 L March 21, 1964 1–5 @ Montreal Canadiens (1963–64) 18–39–12
70 L March 22, 1964 3–4 Chicago Black Hawks (1963–64) 18–40–12

Playoffs[edit | edit source]

  • The Bruins did not qualify for the post season.

Player Stats[edit | edit source]

Regular Season[edit | edit source]

Scoring
# Player Pos GP G A Pts PIM
16 Oliver, MurrayMurray Oliver C 70 24 44 68 41
9 Bucyk, JohnJohn Bucyk LW 62 18 36 54 36
17 Prentice, DeanDean Prentice LW 70 23 16 39 37
7 Kurtenbach, OrlandOrland Kurtenbach C 70 12 25 37 91
19 Mohns, DougDoug Mohns LW/D 70 9 17 26 95
14 Kennedy, ForbesForbes Kennedy C 70 8 17 25 95
10 Johnson, TomTom Johnson D 70 4 21 25 33
20 Boivin, LeoLeo Boivin D 65 10 14 24 42
12 Hebenton, AndyAndy Hebenton RW 70 12 11 23 8
11 Williams, TommyTommy Williams RW 37 8 15 23 8
8 Dornhoefer, GaryGary Dornhoefer RW 32 12 10 22 20
24 Leiter, BobbyBobby Leiter C 56 6 13 19 43
23 Gendron, Jean-GuyJean-Guy Gendron LW 54 5 13 18 43
6 Green, TedTed Green D 70 4 10 14 145
21 Toppazzini, JerryJerry Toppazzini RW 65 7 4 11 15
4 McCord, BobBob McCord D 65 1 9 10 49
25 Rivers, WayneWayne Rivers RW 12 2 7 9 6
18 Westfall, EdEd Westfall D/RW 55 1 5 6 35
8 Connelly, WayneWayne Connelly C 26 2 3 5 12
22 Schock, RonRon Schock C 5 1 2 3 0
22 Awrey, DonDon Awrey D 16 1 0 1 4
25 Beckett, BobBob Beckett C 7 0 1 1 0
22 Irvine, TedTed Irvine LW 1 0 0 0 0
24 Krake, SkipSkip Krake C 2 0 0 0 0
1 Johnston, EddieEddie Johnston G 70 0 0 0 0
Goaltending
Player MIN GP W L T GA GAA SO
Johnston, EddieEddie Johnston 4200 70 18 40 12 211 3.01 6
Team: 4200 70 18 40 12 211 3.01 6

[1]

Note: Pos = Position; GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; PIM = Penalty minutes; PPG = Power-play goals; SHG = Short-handed goals; GWG = Game-winning goals

MIN = Minutes played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; GA = Goals-against; GAA = Goals-against average; SO = Shutouts

Awards and Records[edit | edit source]

  • The largest shutout victory in team history occurred on January 18, 1964 as the Bruins beat the Maple Leafs 11-0.
  • The Bruins did not receive any awards this season.

Transactions[edit | edit source]

Draft Picks[edit | edit source]

The 1963 NHL Entry Draft was the first amateur draft in league history and involved picking 16-year-olds. None of the players picked ever played for the Bruins.

Round Player Position Nationality College/Junior/Club Team (league)
1 Orest Romashyna LW Flag of West Germany West Germany New Hamburg (Junior C)
2 Terrance Lane -- Flag of Canada Canada Georgetown Midgets
3 Roger Bamburak RW Flag of Canada Canada Isaac Brock
4 Jim Blair LW Flag of Canada Canada Georgetown Midgets

Farm Teams[edit | edit source]

Bobby Orr played his first full season of junior hockey for the Oshawa Generals in 1963-64. He was voted to the OHA First All-Star team.

The Bruins development system in 1963-64 was filled with players who would go on to have long NHL careers. However, many would find success with teams other than the Bruins. Led by Bobby Orr, the prospects also included Danny O'Shea, Wayne Cashman, Derek Sanderson, Bill Goldsworthy, Gilles Marotte, Jim Dorey, Bernie Parent, Doug Favell, J. P. Parisé and Terry Crisp.

Trivia[edit | edit source]

  • The Bruins and Detroit Red Wings were scheduled to play on November 24, 1963 but the game was postponed to January 7, 1964 to honor the memory of U.S. President John Kennedy.[2]
  • Dean Prentice had a 6 point game during the 11-0 win over the Toronto Maple Leafs on January 18, 1964.
  • Bruins who recorded a Hat trick this season include:
    • Andy Hebenton and Dean Prentice during the 11-0 win over the Toronto Maple Leafs on January 18, 1964.

Gallery[edit | edit source]

Video[edit | edit source]

A short video of Bob Leiter hitting Eddie Shack, causing glass on the side boards to shatter and then the fight between the two, January 18, 1964.

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1963-64 Boston Bruins Statistics - Hockey-Reference.com. hockey-reference.com. Retrieved on 2009-06-09.
  2. The Official NHL 75th Anniversary Commemorative Book, p.161.


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