46-47BosBru.jpg
1946–47 Boston Bruins · NHL
Division 3rd NHL
1946–47 record 26–23–11
Goals for 190 (2nd, tie)
Goals against 175 (3rd)
General Manager Art Ross
Coach Dit Clapper
Captain Dit Clapper
Jack Crawford
Arena Boston Garden
Team Leaders
Goals Bobby Bauer (30)
Assists Milt Schmidt (35)
Points Milt Schmidt (62)
Penalties in minutes Pat Egan (89)
Wins Frank Brimsek (26)
Goals against average Frank Brimsek (2.91)
← Seasons →
1945–46 1947–48

The 1946–47 Boston Bruins season was the Bruins' 23nd season in the NHL. The Kraut Line of Milt Schmidt, Bobby Bauer and Woody Dumart continued with their scoring prowess and all three finished in the top 10 league scorers and made the All-Star team. The Bruins finished 3rd in the league and lost in the Semi-finals to the Montreal Canadiens 4 games to 1.

Regular Season[edit | edit source]

Pat Egan, Clare Martin, Crawford, Babe Pratt, Henderson and Bep Guidolin in 1946. The "A" is visible on #6 Crawford and #8 Henderson's jerseys.

This was the first year that the team captain and assistants were identified with a letter on their jersey. Milt Schmidt and Bobby Bauer both wore the "C" and defensemen Jack Crawford and Murray Henderson the "A." For some reason, Crawford was designated the team captain.

The Bruins enjoyed line-up stability and relatively few injuries. Goal scoring rose across the league from the previous season with the Kraut Line leading the team and acquisition Joe Carveth chipping in 21 goals. Milt Schmidt finished 4th in league scoring, made the First All-Star Team and was runner-up for the Hart Memorial Trophy. Woody Dumart and Bobby Bauer (with 30 goals and only 4 penalty minutes) both made the Second Team and Bauer won the Lady Byng Memorial Trophy. The defense was solid and joined by 19 year old Fern Flaman for 23 games, the first of a dozen seasons he'd play for the Bruins. Frank Brimsek continued his brilliant play and was voted a Second Team All-Star.

Johnny Peirson had a 5 game tryout beginning on January 4, 1947 while the Bruins shopped Bill Shill, who would be sold. After gaining experience in the minors for a year, Peirson would join the Bruins for good and play nine seasons for them.

Chuck Rayner, #7 Phil Watson, #4 Rene Trudell and the Bruins #11 Don Gallinger, March 2, 1947.

The third line was overhauled for the January 15, 1947 game against the Chicago Black Hawks with Eddie Barry, Jack McGill and Mark Marquess being called up to the team. Marquess would have an immediate impact, scoring twice in his debut, but this would be his only NHL season. Also in this game, Fern Flaman filled in for Babe Pratt and would play 23 games before becoming a regular the next season.

Dit Clapper had retired from playing the year before to coach full-time but due to an injury to Jack Crawford, was called back into service on November 24, 1946 for 3 games and later on December 11, 1946 for 2 games when Babe Pratt was hurt. He also played two games in January 1947. He was the first player in NHL history to play 20 seasons in the league. Before the February 12, 1947 game versus the New York Rangers, Clapper was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. He was the first active player to be inducted.[1] The Bruins celebrated with a 10-1 victory over the Rangers. Clapper's #5 jersey was retired before the March 1, 1947 game against the Montreal Canadiens.

Before the April 1, 1947 playoff game against Montreal, Eddie Shore was similarly honoured with entrance to the Hall of Fame and his #2 jersey was retired. Pat Egan, who had been wearing #2 up until April 1, donned #22 for the rest of the playoffs.

Final Standings[edit | edit source]

National Hockey League GP W L T Pts GF GA PIM
Montreal Canadiens 60 34 16 10 78 189 138 561
Toronto Maple Leafs 60 31 19 10 72 209 172 669
Boston Bruins 60 26 23 11 63 190 175 463
Detroit Red Wings 60 22 27 11 55 190 193 535
New York Rangers 60 22 32 6 50 167 186 426
Chicago Black Hawks 60 19 37 4 42 193 274 467

Note: GP = Games played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, Pts = Points, GF = Goals for, GA = Goals against
Teams that qualified for the playoffs are highlighted in bold.


Game Log[edit | edit source]

Regular Season Results
No. R Date Score Opponent Record
1 T October 19, 1946 1–1 @ Montreal Canadiens (1946–47) 0–0–1
2 T October 20, 1946 2–2 Chicago Black Hawks (1946–47) 0–0–2
3 T October 23, 1946 3–3 Toronto Maple Leafs (1946–47) 0–0–3
4 W October 26, 1946 3–1 New York Rangers (1946–47) 1–0–3
5 T October 30, 1946 3–3 @ New York Rangers (1946–47) 1–0–4
6 W November 2, 1946 5–0 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1946–47) 2–0–4
7 L November 3, 1946 3–5 @ Chicago Black Hawks (1946–47) 2–1–4
8 T November 6, 1946 3–3 @ Detroit Red Wings (1946–47) 2–1–5
9 L November 9, 1946 2–5 @ Montreal Canadiens (1946–47) 2–2–5
10 W November 10, 1946 4–0 @ New York Rangers (1946–47) 3–2–5
11 W November 13, 1946 5–2 Detroit Red Wings (1946–47) 4–2–5
12 L November 17, 1946 1–4 Montreal Canadiens (1946–47) 4–3–5
13 W November 20, 1946 4–1 Toronto Maple Leafs (1946–47) 5–3–5
14 L November 24, 1946 2–4 Montreal Canadiens (1946–47) 5–4–5
15 W November 27, 1946 5–2 New York Rangers (1946–47) 6–4–5
16 T December 1, 1946 3–3 Detroit Red Wings (1946–47) 6–4–6
17 T December 4, 1946 2–2 Toronto Maple Leafs (1946–47) 6–4–7
18 L December 7, 1946 1–5 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1946–47) 6–5–7
19 L December 8, 1946 4–6 New York Rangers (1946–47) 6–6–7
20 W December 11, 1946 4–1 Chicago Black Hawks (1946–47) 7–6–7
21 W December 15, 1946 3–2 Detroit Red Wings (1946–47) 8–6–7
22 W December 18, 1946 3–2 New York Rangers (1946–47) 9–6–7
23 L December 21, 1946 1–5 @ Montreal Canadiens (1946–47) 9–7–7
24 L December 22, 1946 1–5 @ Chicago Black Hawks (1946–47) 9–8–7
25 L December 25, 1946 3–5 Chicago Black Hawks (1946–47) 9–9–7
26 L December 28, 1946 3–4 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1946–47) 9–10–7
27 T December 29, 1946 2–2 @ New York Rangers (1946–47) 9–10–8
28 W January 1, 1947 3–1 New York Rangers (1946–47) 10–10–8
29 L January 4, 1947 1–4 @ Montreal Canadiens (1946–47) 10–11–8
30 L January 5, 1947 1–3 @ Detroit Red Wings (1946–47) 10–12–8
31 W January 8, 1947 3–1 @ New York Rangers (1946–47) 11–12–8
32 L January 11, 1947 3–4 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1946–47) 11–13–8
33 L January 12, 1947 1–5 @ Detroit Red Wings (1946–47) 11–14–8
34 W January 15, 1947 6–3 Chicago Black Hawks (1946–47) 12–14–8
35 W January 18, 1947 3–1 Chicago Black Hawks (1946–47) 13–14–8
36 W January 19, 1947 3–2 Toronto Maple Leafs (1946–47) 14–14–8
37 L January 22, 1947 3–4 Montreal Canadiens (1946–47) 14–15–8
38 L January 25, 1947 1–4 @ Montreal Canadiens (1946–47) 14–16–8
39 W January 26, 1947 4–3 Detroit Red Wings (1946–47) 15–16–8
40 W January 29, 1947 4–1 Detroit Red Wings (1946–47) 16–16–8
41 T February 1, 1947 2–2 @ Detroit Red Wings (1946–47) 16–16–9
42 L February 2, 1947 1–3 @ Chicago Black Hawks (1946–47) 16–17–9
43 L February 5, 1947 2–3 Montreal Canadiens (1946–47) 16–18–9
44 L February 8, 1947 2–5 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1946–47) 16–19–9
45 L February 9, 1947 4–6 @ Chicago Black Hawks (1946–47) 16–20–9
46 W February 12, 1947 10–1 New York Rangers (1946–47) 17–20–9
47 T February 16, 1947 2–2 Montreal Canadiens (1946–47) 17–20–10
48 L February 19, 1947 0–6 @ New York Rangers (1946–47) 17–21–10
49 L February 20, 1947 0–3 @ Detroit Red Wings (1946–47) 17–22–10
50 W February 23, 1947 9–4 @ Chicago Black Hawks (1946–47) 18–22–10
51 W March 1, 1947 2–1 @ Montreal Canadiens (1946–47) 19–22–10
52 W March 2, 1947 3–2 @ New York Rangers (1946–47) 20–22–10
53 W March 5, 1947 5–4 Toronto Maple Leafs (1946–47) 21–22–10
54 W March 9, 1947 6–0 Detroit Red Wings (1946–47) 22–22–10
55 W March 12, 1947 8–3 @ Chicago Black Hawks (1946–47) 23–22–10
56 W March 13, 1947 3–2 @ Detroit Red Wings (1946–47) 24–22–10
57 T March 15, 1947 5–5 @ Toronto Maple Leafs (1946–47) 24–22–11
58 W March 16, 1947 5–3 Toronto Maple Leafs (1946–47) 25–22–11
59 W March 19, 1947 7–3 Chicago Black Hawks (1946–47) 26–22–11
60 L March 23, 1947 2–3 Montreal Canadiens (1946–47) 26–23–11

Playoffs[edit | edit source]

Montreal Canadiens 4, Boston Bruins 1[edit | edit source]

Having met the year before in the 1946 Stanley Cup Finals where the Habs defeated the Bruins 4 games to 1, the Canadiens would repeat the victory in 5 games, though two games were decided in overtime.

Game 1 at the Montreal Forum saw the Bruins jump out to an early lead on a goal by Ken Smith. Bill Durnan would not allow another and goals by Toe Blake, Jimmy Peters and Johnny Quilty secured a 3-1 win for the Habs.

Game 2 in Montreal was a tight checking affair with a scoreless first period. Bobby Bauer scored for the Bruins at 3:02 of the second period which held up until Ken Reardon tied it with less than a minute left in the game. Montreal's Ken Mosdell was the OT hero 5:38 in and the Habs took a 2-0 series lead to Boston. Bruins All-Star defenseman Jack Crawford was lost to injury for the remainder of the series.

Game 3 at the Boston Garden was a rough affair with several brawls. Maurice Richard opened the scoring :38 seconds in which Ken Mosdell extended five minutes later. At the 14:38 minute mark, Woody Dumart and Richard got into a scrap, resulting in a major penalty to Richard. The second period saw 4 majors handed out and Richard receive a game misconduct. Energized, the Bruins struck for 3 goals by Milt Schmidt, Joe Carveth and Schmidt again and led 3-2 at the end of the second period. Ken Reardon was knocked out of the series after receiving a check from Bep Guidolin and breaking his toe after hitting the boards. Deflated, the Habs didn't counter and Dumart's first of the playoffs 14:48 into the third period led the Bruins to a 4-2 win.

Game 4 in Boston saw Eddie Shore honored with entry into the Hockey Hall of Fame and his #2 jersey retired. Playing without defensemen Crawford and Murray Henderson, Montreal's Billy Reay ruined the celebration with a 4 goal performance as the Habs took a 3-1 stranglehold on the series.

Game 5 in Montreal saw the Bruins Pentti Lund play his first ever game in place of Jack McGill. After a scoreless first period, Toe Blake scored 45 seconds into the second but the Bruins Carveth and Schmidt scored within 20 seconds of each other to make it 2-1 Bruins at the end of the period. Richard tied it up at 7:43 of the third but Ken Smith put the Bruins up 3-2 at 11:40. With time running out, Richard scored again with a little over 3 minutes remaining and the game headed to overtime. The Bruins had a scary moment when Fern Flaman took a penalty 15:25 into the first OT, but managed to kill it off. Late in the second OT, a shot by Murph Chamberlain hit the post and dropped for Johnny Quilty who rapped in the winner. Montreal won the series 4 games to 1.

# Date Visitor Score Home Record
1 March 25 Boston Bruins 1-3 Montreal Canadiens 0-1
2 March 27 Boston Bruins 1-2 (OT) Montreal Canadiens 0-2
3 March 29 Montreal Canadiens 2-4 Boston Bruins 1-2
4 April 1 Montreal Canadiens 1-5 Boston Bruins 3-1
5 April 3 Boston Bruins 3-4 (2OT) Montreal Canadiens 1-4

Player Stats[edit | edit source]

Regular Season[edit | edit source]

Scoring
# Player Pos GP G A Pts PIM
15 Schmidt, MiltMilt Schmidt C 59 27 35 62 40
17 Bauer, BobbyBobby Bauer RW 58 30 24 54 4
14 Dumart, WoodyWoody Dumart LW 60 24 28 52 12
10 Cowley, BillBill Cowley C 51 13 25 38 16
9 Carveth, JoeJoe Carveth RW 51 21 15 36 18
11 Gallinger, DonDon Gallinger C 47 11 19 30 12
2 Egan, PatPat Egan D 60 7 18 25 89
12 Guidolin, BepBep Guidolin LW 56 10 13 23 73
20 Smith, KennyKenny Smith LW 60 14 7 21 4
7 Reardon, TerryTerry Reardon C/RW 60 6 14 20 17
6 Crawford, JackJack Crawford D 58 1 17 18 16
8 Henderson, MurrayMurray Henderson D 57 5 12 17 63
16 McGill, JackJack McGill C 24 5 9 14 19
19 Marquess, MarkMark Marquess RW 27 5 4 9 6
4, 5, 21 Pratt, BabeBabe Pratt D 31 4 4 8 25
4 Flaman, FernFern Flaman D 23 1 4 5 41
18 Barry, EdEd Barry LW 19 1 3 4 2
21 Martin, ClareClare Martin D 6 3 0 3 0
16 Shill, BillBill Shill RW 27 2 0 2 2
19 Grosso, DonDon Grosso LW/C 33 0 2 2 2
18 McAtee, NormNorm McAtee C 13 0 1 1 0
16 Peirson, JohnnyJohnny Peirson RW 5 0 0 0 0
5 Clapper, DitDit Clapper RW/D 7 0 0 0 0
1 Brimsek, FrankFrank Brimsek G 60 0 0 0 2
Goaltending
Player MIN GP W L T GA GAA SO
Brimsek, FrankFrank Brimsek 3600 60 26 23 11 175 2.92 3
Team: 3600 60 26 23 11 175 2.92 3

Playoffs[edit | edit source]

Scoring
# Player Pos GP G A Pts PIM
15 Schmidt, MiltMilt Schmidt C/D 5 3 1 4 4
20 Smith, KennyKenny Smith LW 5 3 0 3 2
9 Carveth, JoeJoe Carveth RW 5 2 1 3 0
7 Reardon, TerryTerry Reardon C/RW 5 0 3 3 2
17 Bauer, BobbyBobby Bauer RW 5 1 1 2 0
14 Dumart, WoodyWoody Dumart LW 5 1 1 2 8
10 Cowley, BillBill Cowley C 5 0 2 2 0
2 Egan, PatPat Egan D 5 0 2 2 6
12 Guidolin, BepBep Guidolin LW 3 0 1 1 6
21 Martin, ClareClare Martin D 5 0 1 1 0
18 Lund, PenttiPentti Lund RW 1 0 0 0 0
6 Crawford, JackJack Crawford D 2 0 0 0 0
11 Gallinger, DonDon Gallinger C 4 0 0 0 7
8 Henderson, MurrayMurray Henderson D 4 0 0 0 4
19 Marquess, MarkMark Marquess RW 4 0 0 0 0
4 Flaman, FernFern Flaman D 5 0 0 0 8
16 McGill, JackJack McGill C 5 0 0 0 11
1 Brimsek, FrankFrank Brimsek G 5 0 0 0 0
Goaltending
Player MIN GP W L GA GAA SO
Brimsek, FrankFrank Brimsek 343 5 1 4 16 2.80 0
Team: 343 5 1 4 16 2.80 0

Note: Pos = Position; GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; PIM = Penalty minutes; PPG = Power-play goals; SHG = Short-handed goals; GWG = Game-winning goals

MIN = Minutes played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; GA = Goals-against; GAA = Goals-against average; SO = Shutouts

Awards and Records[edit | edit source]

Transactions[edit | edit source]

Trivia[edit | edit source]

  • Pat Egan had been wearing jersey #2 all season until it was retired in honour of Eddie Shore on April 1, 1947. Egan switched to jersey #22 for the remainder of the playoffs. This was the first time a Bruin wore #22 and was the highest number, up to that time, that a Bruin had ever worn.
  • The Bruins played the first penalty-free game in their history during the 3-3 tie versus the Detroit Red Wings on November 6, 1946.
  • Bruins who recorded a Hat trick this season include:
    • Joe Carveth during the 5-2 win over the Detroit Red Wings on November 13, 1946.
    • Bobby Bauer (all in the first period) during the 4-1 win over the Toronto Maple Leafs on November 20, 1946.
    • Bobby Bauer during the 5-4 win over the Maple Leafs on March 5, 1947. A natural hat trick, all goals were scored on the power play in the first period.
    • Joe Carveth during the 7-3 win over the Chicago Black Hawks on March 19, 1947.

Gallery[edit | edit source]

Video[edit | edit source]

Over 11 minutes of silent clips of the March 15, 1947 Bruins-Leafs game which ended in a 5-5 tie. Goals by Joe Klukay and Harry Watson are shown.

See Also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Hockey's Book of Firsts, p.25, James Duplacey, JG Press, ISBN 978-1-57215-037-9
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