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1928–29 Boston Bruins · NHL
Stanley Cup Champions
Prince of Wales Trophy Winners
American Division Champions
Division 1st American
1928–29 record 26–13–5
Home record 15–6–1
Road record 11–7–4
Goals for 89 (1st)
Goals against 52 (2nd)
General Manager Art Ross
Coach Cy Denneny
Captain Lionel Hitchman
Arena Boston Garden
Team Leaders
Goals Harry Oliver (17)
Assists Eddie Shore
Cooney Weiland (7)
Points Harry Oliver (23)
Penalties in minutes Eddie Shore (96)
Wins Tiny Thompson (26)
Goals against average Tiny Thompson (1.15)
← Seasons →
1927–28 1929–30

The 1928–29 Boston Bruins season was the Bruins' fifth season in the NHL. Boston defended its American Division title, finished second in the NHL and won their second Prince of Wales Trophy. They went on to defeat the New York Rangers in the finals to become the third American-based team to become Stanley Cup champions. The Cup winning goal was scored by Bill Carson.

Regular Season[edit | edit source]

In the off-season, the Bruins acquired Cy Denneny from the Ottawa Senators, who became a player-coach for the team, taking over from Art Ross, who stepped down to concentrate on his general manager duties. The team also had a new goaltender with the retirement of Hal Winkler, rookie Tiny Thompson, who spent the 1927–28 season with the Bruins' farm team, the Minneapolis Millers of the AHA, and a promising new forward, Cooney Weiland, who also played with Minneapolis. The team also moved into a new home, the Boston Garden. In their debut game at the Garden, the Bruins lost 1–0 to the Montreal Canadiens.[1]

Third line center Bill Carson scored the Bruins first Cup winning goal.

Boston got off to a slow start, and through their first 14 games, the Bruins had a record of 5–7–2, tied with the Pittsburgh Pirates. As the season progressed, Boston made a few trades, acquiring star Mickey MacKay from the Pirates and Bill Carson from the Toronto Maple Leafs. Lester Patrick and the New York Rangers offered Winthrop native Myles Lane to the Bruins, astonishingly asking for superstar Eddie Shore in return. Bruins' general manager Art Ross replied famously, "You are so many Myles from Shore you need a life preserver." Nonetheless, the Bruins purchased Lane's rights for $7,500.

Further, Weiland was matched with Dit Clapper and Dutch Gainor on a powerful forward line which garnered the nickname "Dynamite Line," one of the first named forward lines in history. The Bruins rebounded with a 13 game unbeaten streak, which gave them a 16–7–4 record and suddenly in contention with the New York Rangers for top spot in the American Division. Boston had a 10–6–1 record in their remaining 17 games, and held off the Rangers to defend their American Division and the Prince of Wales Trophy, finishing with a 26–13–5 mark and a team record 57 points.

Harry Oliver led Boston in scoring, with 17 goals and 23 points. Dutch Gainor and defenseman Eddie Shore finished just behind Oliver with 19 points, while rookie Cooney Weiland tallied 11 goals and 18 points. Shore led the club with 96 penalty minutes, while team captain Lionel Hitchman finished with 64 penalty minutes.

In goal, Tiny Thompson had an impressive rookie season, winning 26 games while posting a 1.15 goals against average—both Bruins' records, as well as recording 12 shutouts. Thompson's 1.15 GAA remains the Bruins' single-season record and is the second lowest ever recorded over a full season in NHL history.

Due to construction of the new Chicago Arena, the Bruins played the Chicago Black Hawks at Fort Erie, Ontario on February 2, 1929 and won, 3-0.

Final Standings[edit | edit source]

American Division
GP W L T GF GA PTS
Boston Bruins 44 26 13 5 89 52 57
New York Rangers 44 21 13 10 72 65 52
Detroit Cougars 44 19 16 9 72 63 47
Pittsburgh Pirates 44 9 27 8 46 80 26
Chicago Black Hawks 44 7 29 8 33 85 22

Note: GP = Games Played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, Pts = Points, GF = Goals For, GA = Goals Against

Teams that qualified for the playoffs are highlighted in bold.


Game Log[edit | edit source]

Regular Season Schedule
# Date Visitor Score Home Record Pts
1 November 15 Boston Bruins 1–0 Pittsburgh Pirates (1928–29) 1–0–0 2
2 November 17 Boston Bruins 2–2 Ottawa Senators (1928–29) 1–0–1 3
3 November 20 Montreal Canadiens (1928–29) 1–0 Boston Bruins 1–1–1 3
4 November 22 Boston Bruins 0–2 Detroit Cougars (1928–29) 1–2–1 3
5 November 25 Boston Bruins 1–1 Chicago Black Hawks (1928–29) 1–2–2 4
6 November 27 Pittsburgh Pirates (1928–29) 0–1 Boston Bruins 2–2–2 6
7 December 4 New York Rangers (1928–29) 0–2 Boston Bruins 3–2–2 8
8 December 8 Montreal Maroons (1928–29) 1–5 Boston Bruins 4–2–2 10
9 December 9 Boston Bruins 1–2 New York Americans (1928–29) 4–3–2 10
10 December 11 New York Americans (1928–29) 3–0 Boston Bruins 4–4–2 10
11 December 15 Boston Bruins 0–2 Toronto Maple Leafs (1928–29) 4–5–2 10
12 December 18 Detroit Cougars (1928–29) 1–3 Boston Bruins 5–5–2 12
13 December 25 Chicago Black Hawks (1928–29) 2–1 Boston Bruins 5–6–2 12
14 December 30 Boston Bruins 0–2 New York Rangers (1928–29) 5–7–2 12
15 January 1 Ottawa Senators (1928–29) 0–3 Boston Bruins 6–7–2 14
16 January 3 Boston Bruins 1–0 Montreal Maroons (1928–29) 7–7–2 16
17 January 5 Pittsburgh Pirates (1928–29) 2–3 Boston Bruins 8–7–2 18
18 January 8 Toronto Maple Leafs (1928–29) 2–5 Boston Bruins 9–7–2 20
19 January 10 Boston Bruins 4–2 Montreal Canadiens (1928–29) 10–7–2 22
20 January 12 Detroit Cougars (1928–29) 2–3 Boston Bruins 11–7–2 24
21 January 15 New York Rangers (1928–29) 1–4 Boston Bruins 12–7–2 26
22 January 17 Boston Bruins 1–1 Detroit Cougars (1928–29) 12–7–3 27
23 January 20 Boston Bruins 2–0 Chicago Black Hawks (1928–29) 13–7–3 29
24 January 22 Montreal Canadiens (1928–29) 0–0 Boston Bruins 13–7–4 30
25 January 27 Boston Bruins 2–1 New York Rangers (1928–29) 14–7–4 32
26 January 29 Chicago Black Hawks (1928–29) 1–4 Boston Bruins 15–7–4 34
27 January 31 Boston Bruins 3–1 Toronto Maple Leafs (1928–29) 16–7–4 36
28 February 2 Toronto Maple Leafs (1928–29) 3–0 Boston Bruins 16–8–4 36
29 February 5 New York Americans (1928–29) 1–0 Boston Bruins 16–9–4 36
30 February 9 Boston Bruins 0–1 Montreal Maroons (1928–29) 16–10–4 36
31 February 12 Detroit Cougars (1928–29) 0–1 Boston Bruins 17–10–4 38
32 February 14 Boston Bruins 0–2 Pittsburgh Pirates (1928–29) 17–11–4 38
33 February 16 Boston Bruins 3–0 Chicago Black Hawks (1928–29) 18–11–4 40
34 February 19 Pittsburgh Pirates (1928–29) 0–1 Boston Bruins 19–11–4 42
35 February 24 Boston Bruins 2–2 New York Americans (1928–29) 19–11–5 43
36 February 26 Montreal Maroons (1928–29) 0–1 Boston Bruins 20–11–5 45
37 February 28 Boston Bruins 4–0 Ottawa Senators (1928–29) 21–11–5 47
38 March 2 Boston Bruins 0–3 Montreal Canadiens (1928–29) 21–12–5 47
39 March 5 New York Rangers (1928–29) 1–2 Boston Bruins 22–12–5 49
40 March 9 Ottawa Senators (1928–29) 2–1 Boston Bruins 22–13–5 49
41 March 10 Boston Bruins 3–2 New York Rangers (1928–29) 23–13–5 51
42 March 12 Chicago Black Hawks (1928–29) 1–11 Boston Bruins 24–13–5 53
43 March 14 Boston Bruins 5–1 Detroit Cougars (1928–29) 25–13–5 55
44 March 16 Boston Bruins 3–1 Pittsburgh Pirates (1928–29) 26–13–5 57

Playoffs[edit | edit source]

Program from Game 3 in Montreal.

In the playoffs, Boston had a 1st round bye, due to finishing on top of the American Division.

Boston Bruins 3, Montreal Canadiens 0[edit | edit source]

The Bruins faced the Montreal Canadiens for the first time in the playoffs. As the winners of the Canadian Division, Montreal had also received a bye to the semi-finals in a best-of-five series.

Game 1 began at the Boston Garden where brilliant goaltending by Tiny Thompson led Boston to a 1-0 win on an early first period goal by Cooney Weiland.

Game 2 was a repeat of Game 1, an early goal by Weiland and Thompson shutting out the Habs for a 1-0 victory. However, this game was a much rougher affair with 30 minutes in penalties called.

Game 3 saw the series shift to the Montreal Forum and out do Game 2's roughness with 48 minutes in penalties called. The Habs shot out to a 2-0 first period lead on goals by Albert Leduc and Aurel Joliat 8 seconds apart. But the Bruins roared back in the second period with 3 straight goals by Bill Carson, Dutch Gainor and Eddie Shore to win 3-2 and sweep the series 3-0.

# Date Visitor Score Home Record
1 March 19 Montreal Canadiens 0–1 Boston Bruins 1–0
2 March 21 Montreal Canadiens 0–1 Boston Bruins 2–0
3 March 23 Boston Bruins 3–2 Montreal Canadiens 3–0

Boston Bruins 2, New York Rangers 0[edit | edit source]

In the 1929 Stanley Cup Finals, Boston faced their divisional rival, the New York Rangers, who had eliminated them from the playoffs the previous season in a best-of-three series. New York had defeated the Detroit Cougars and the Toronto Maple Leafs to earn a spot in the Finals.

Game 1 was played at the Boston Garden where second period goals by Dit Clapper and Dutch Gainor led the Bruins to a 2-0 win. Tiny Thompson posted his third shutout in four playoff games.

Game 2 moved to Madison Square Garden in New York City where the teams played to a scoreless first period. Boston jumped out to a 1-0 lead on a goal by Harry Oliver in the second. Desperate, the Rangers played furiously in the third and Butch Keeling scored his third of the playoffs to tie it up. With less than two minutes to go, Bill Carson was the hero, defeating the Rangers 2–1, to clinch the first Stanley Cup in Bruins history and making them the third American team to win the Cup.

# Date Visitor Score Home Record
1 March 28 New York Rangers 0–2 Boston Bruins 1–0
2 March 29 Boston Bruins 2–1 New York Rangers 2–0

Player Stats[edit | edit source]

Regular Season[edit | edit source]

Scoring
# Player Pos GP G A Pts PIM
9 Oliver, HarryHarry Oliver RW 43 17 6 23 24
8 Gainor, DutchDutch Gainor C 44 14 5 19 30
2 Shore, EddieEddie Shore D 39 12 7 19 96
14 Weiland, CooneyCooney Weiland C 42 11 7 18 16
12 Clapper, DitDit Clapper RW/D 40 9 2 11 48
5 MacKay, MickeyMickey MacKay C 30 8 2 10 18
11 Owen, GeorgeGeorge Owen D 27 5 4 9 48
15 Bill CarsonBill Carson C 19 4 2 6 10
5 Fredrickson, FrankFrank Fredrickson C 12 3 1 4 24
6 Galbraith, PercyPercy Galbraith LW/D 38 2 1 3 44
16 Denneny, CyCy Denneny LW 23 1 2 3 2
7, 15 Klein, LloydLloyd Klein LW 8 1 0 1 5
4 Lane, MylesMyles Lane D 19 1 0 1 2
3 Hitchman, LionelLionel Hitchman D 38 1 0 1 64
4 Pettinger, EricEric Pettinger LW/C 17 0 0 0 17
10 Rodden, EddieEddie Rodden C 20 0 0 0 10
7 Green, RedRed Green LW 22 0 0 0 16
1 Thompson, TinyTiny Thompson G 44 0 0 0 0
Goaltending
Player MIN GP W L T GA GAA SO
Thompson, TinyTiny Thompson 2710 44 26 13 5 52 1.15 12
Team: 2710 44 26 13 5 52 1.15 12

Playoffs[edit | edit source]

Scoring
# Player Pos GP G A Pts PIM
10, 15 Bill CarsonBill Carson C 5 2 0 2 6
8 Gainor, DutchDutch Gainor C 5 2 0 2 4
14 Weiland, CooneyCooney Weiland C 5 2 0 2 2
9 Oliver, HarryHarry Oliver RW 5 1 1 2 4
2 Shore, EddieEddie Shore D 5 1 1 2 28
12 Clapper, DitDit Clapper RW/D 5 1 0 1 0
3 Hitchman, LionelLionel Hitchman D 5 0 1 1 22
16 Denneny, CyCy Denneny LW 2 0 0 0 0
5, 16 MacKay, MickeyMickey MacKay C 3 0 0 0 2
4 Lane, MylesMyles Lane D 5 0 0 0 0
11 Owen, GeorgeGeorge Owen D 5 0 0 0 0
6 Galbraith, PercyPercy Galbraith LW/D 5 0 0 0 2
1 Thompson, TinyTiny Thompson G 5 0 0 0 0
Goaltending
Player MIN GP W L GA GAA SO
Thompson, TinyTiny Thompson 300 5 5 0 3 0.60 3
Team: 300 5 5 0 3 0.60 3

Note: Pos = Position; GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; PIM = Penalty minutes; PPG = Power-play goals; SHG = Short-handed goals; GWG = Game-winning goals

MIN = Minutes played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; GA = Goals-against; GAA = Goals-against average; SO = Shutouts

Awards and Records[edit | edit source]

Transactions[edit | edit source]

Trivia[edit | edit source]

Gallery[edit | edit source]

See Also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "HOCKEY; A Garden Fades This Fall", The New York Times, September 27, 1995. Accessed January 26, 2008. "It began in the Garden on Nov. 20, 1928 with another shutout. The Canadiens beat the Bruins, 1–0, in the first game in the building."

Sources[edit | edit source]

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